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Full text of "Wolf, The [Yearbook]"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/wolfyearbook1924loyo 



THE CLASS OF 
NINETEEN TWENTY-FOUR 



Presents Volume I of 

THE WOLF 




FbaEwoRD 



Not from the snotvy stillness of the 
North 
As the fearful leader 
Of a paclf of spoilers; 
But 
As the faithful sentinel 

Of a sunny Southern garden land, 

THE LOYOLA WOLF 








Stands for the first time revealed 
to the public gaze 
Not cowed or coiving. 
But bold in the freshness of 
youth. 
And strong in the hope of a 

glorious maturity; 
The memory and embodiment 
of an ever 
Greater Loyola. 



_• - i. - , J r-' 



CL 




G3n:te:nT3 



Book I The University 

Book II The Classes 

Book III Athletics 

Book IV Organizations 

Book V Features 



J[)e:dication 



■"^'.-•n ncEiSprvjTTOffS 



TO 

One whose powers of mind are made more 
resplendent by their setting in a heart 
so pure and a character so 
strong ; whose vision has 
lifted the veil and given 
to airy nothings an hab- 
itation and a name; 
whose hands have builded 
much and well, and whose 
ideals have been the in- 
spiration of the faculty, 
the students, and the well- 
wishers of Loyola, this 
first edition of The Wolf 
is affectionately dedicated 




L O Y O L A U N I V K R S ! ' T' Y 



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REV. E. A. CUMMINGS, S. J. 



hi E W O L F, 19 2 4 



OLA 





E 



•\'7 ER, reader, tbe.'ie tovneriiis morm- 
menli of Gothic splendor, rising heav- 
enuiarJ from n>ide-spreading campus 
of soidbern lawn and woodland, and meet 
Ti'lihin those inlelleciual leaders who are di- 
recting Lovola's destinies. 



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JL. 



CHAPTER ONE 

UNIVERSITY 



_r:5i I 1 




EXTRAXCE TO MARQUETTE HALL 



T HE \X^ O L F, 19 2 4 



LOYOLA UNIV 



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CHURCH OF THE HOLY XAME 




A GLIMPSE OF THE PARK 







'.45 



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THE CAMPUS 




.MARQUETTE H.AI 




HORHT HALL CHEMISTRY BUILDING 





THE TOWER OF CHIMES 



ACROSS THE QLADRAXGLE 



'! HE WOLF, 1924 



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LOYOLA UNIVL 



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T H E W O L F> 19 2 4 



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LOYOLA UNIVLLS[T^ 




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]■: V;- O L F, 19 2 4 



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LOYOLA UNIV 



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DEAN F. D. SULLIVAN, S. J. 



L F, 19 2 4 



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THE WOLF. 1924 



LOYOLA UNIVERSn 



f 




DEAN C. V. VIGNES, D.D.S. 
Denial Department 



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rilE \X/OLF, 192 4 



/^ 



,0\'OLA 



I ■■,',■ , ' ■ I 




Prof. E. A. Gamard, D.D.S. 




Prof. Jos. E. Psavla. D.D.S. 



I :■. .IB 



^ 



i: W O L F\ 19 2 4 



.OYOLA UNIVL 





"■■"■■ 

■ :-: ' 

',v:-i 
\ 1 


1 




.•■:-■ 

m 


I 




Prof. Lucian Bland, D.D.S. 




Prof. Charles P. Kellehf,r, D.D.S. 



N : --' -■ ■ ■ W I 



Vr> 




Prof. J. H. Lanhrv, D.D.S. 




i?^ 



Prof. R. E. SiiinuvnoD, D.D.S. 



THE W O L F, 1924 



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LOYOLA UNIVERSIT 






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mm 

km 



mm 



Pkof. y. I, RvAx, D.D.S. 




Prof. W. V. Gavle, D.D.S. 



"xir 



E WOLF. 192-1 



L.O"\"OLA Uri i^'T-R orr'i 




Dr. D. C. White, D.D.S. 




Dr. F. J. Genoe, D.D.S. 




Dr. D. F. B.^llma, D.D.S. 



T H y. '"' O i.. F. 1 •- 2 4 



y^ 



LOYOL.A UNT 




Dr. G. O. Rosaua, D.D.S. 




Dr. N. F. Gli;n-o. D.D.S. 



I 




Dr. L. R. Rolling, D.D.S. 



24 



^- 



v;." O L F, 




DEAN H. C. CAGE 



H E. W O L F, 19 2 4 



.^^ 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 










REV. MICHAEL KENN'V, S. J. 
Regent. Lazs; De{>artmeni 



26 



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L F. 19 2 4 



:) VO! A L 




HON. JOSEPH A. BREAIX 

E.x-C.liiif Justin' Siifirnnr Court of Louisiana 



y^ 



LOYOLA UN 




If. --..''ii'ii 



JuDcr C. I. Deneciiaud 




Secretary Alfred J. Bonomo 



£ W' O L F, 19 2 4 







Prof. B. Kern'ax 




Prof. S. A. Mitch fi. 




Prof. E. Vidrine 



T H L WOLF, 1924 



/^ 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



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,11 [.-ii; 

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lilliTS) 




Proi. S. R. Barm. I i 




Prof. A. J. Peters 



F. I 9 2 4 



-OYOLA Ur-J] 




PiiOF. IIenrv B. Cur'iis 




I'DOF. Luther Hall 



1-1 ]■ \v.- n 



\ ': A 



LOYOLA UNIVERSIT 




Tl 



1924 



]_. U \ u L .-',. 



s ri' 




REV. W. A. Bl'RK 
Reijent of Pliannacy Di'/'arlmcnt 



THE \V O L F, I 9 2 4 



LOYOLA UNIVERSIT 




DR. J. O. WEILBAECHER, M.D. 



~"A£/ 



1^" \\.' O [ . F. I <) I -! 




Prof. E. T. Cassidy, S. J. 
Iliad of tlic Physics Diparlment 




Prok. L. J. X. Di Irkil 
Inslntctor in Pliysics 



-! E WOLF I '^l 



/^ 



LOYOLA UNIVERSIT 




Prof. P. Iorre, B.E. 
I'rnfrssor of Draiiiiiij 




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llnCMi^f! 



Prof. \V. Daly, A.B. 
Professor of Economics 



"ytr 



F. I 9 



I C 




PkOI. SlDSEV L. TiBLIER. M.S., 0.0. S. 

I'rojnsor of Cliein'ulry 




Prof. Edwix L. Merii.h 
Professor of liioloyy 



37 



TH1£ WOLF. 192 4- 



/^^ 



!i!itel 



;;!: 



/c/'ii' '"'1 '1 




Miss Joscphinc Thomas, A.M. 
Projcssor of Education 




Miss Angela Serrako 
Mctliodi in Teaching 




PAUSE, dear reader, to coiiicnipUite 
the j-ioble hrows and honest faces of 
the men and women whose mental, 
moral and ph\)sical devehpmeni is the glory 
of the University. Enter the Seniors. 

iiiiSMiiliiili 





CHAPTER TWO 

THE CLASSES 



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LOYOLA UN J V'L}' 



IRENE J. BARRIOS 

LL.M. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

LL.B., 1922, Loyola. 



MARC. DUPUY 

LL.M. 

"Judge" 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

LL.B., 1923, Loyola. 



JAMES COMMODORE JACKSON 

LL.M. 

ROCKFORD, Ar.A. 

LL.B., 1919, Georgetown. 



FRANK JOSEPH STICH 

LL.M. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

LL.B., 1922, Loyola. 




n ] !• 



/^/ 



LOYOLA UNIVERSr 




HENRY EDWARD CORCORAN 

LL.M. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

LL.B., Georgetown. 



ROBERT R. DINSOMORE 

LL.M. 
MACON, MISS. 

LL.B., 1921, U. of Mississippi. 



ALBERT B. KOORIE 

LL.M. 

ALEXANDRIA, LA. 

LL.B., Loyola. 



CLIFFORD A. RUSH 
LL.M. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
LL.B., 1 91 6, Georgetown. 



42 



r 1 ^) 



GEORGE M. BROOKS 
LL.iM. 

NEW ORLEANS, r.A. 

LL.B., 1923, Loyola. 



ARCHIBALD THOMAS HIGGINS 

LL.M. 

NtW ORLEANS, LA. 

LL.B., 1916, Tulane. 



FELIX ESTRADA ORANTES 
LL.M. 

.NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

LL.B., Guatemala Law School. 



MAX MASS SCHAUMBERGER 

LL.M. 

NEW ORLEA.NS, LA. 

LL.B., L. S. U. 




43 



T H E \V O L F, 19 2 4 



,/^l 



LOYOLA UNL 




A. BRENT BOD FISH 
LL.^r. 

NEW ORI. FAN'S, LA. 

I,I..B., 1923, Lnynla 



GEORGE P. EBERLE 

LL.M. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

LL.I^., 1923, Loyola 



ARTIH'R J. O'KFEFE, JR. 
LL.M. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

I.E.B., 1923, I.ovnln 



ViJ 



1 > 



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GEORGE AZAR. A.B. 

"Georyc" 

NHW ORLEANS, LA. 

Fi;U. E. K. S. ; Sodality. 

"//(' liatli dniuk iici^y from ilic fount of 

hioiilrii{/t\" 

Quii't tlHiugh liL- he, George lias ht-eii su.-.fss- 
ful in lorming a widi^ ciicle of friends during 
his two years at Loyola. Ambitious and thor- 
ous^h, he has been a faithful student, and leaves 
oui Alma Mater with knowledge which only 
those can acauire who persevere to the end in 
MIiI-lyiTiR themseUes to their studies. He was 
\oU-rt the best all-round student in the College 
Department, and well deserves the honor that 
was bestowed upon him by his fellow students, 
lie is the candidate of the Senior Class for 
liniiors in medicine. 

WILLIAM JACK HARKER, A.H. 
"Jack" 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Secretary Sodality. 
"On ^nth the dance; let joy he unconfined" 
If tears were in his e>'es, they would o:iI\ 
come from laughter! "Who is there who hns 
ever seen, heard, or imag:ined "Jack" otherwise 
than g-ay? Althoug-h a favorite with the fair 
sex, we can, at least, lay claim to hini as a 
popular student, and look upon his winning 
ways as prophecies of success. He has ever 
maintained a high standard in his studies and 
a particular interest in all that is Ijoyola's. 

ANOREW BROrSSARO, A.H. 
"Andy" 

KAPLAN, LA. 

Secretary Aquinas 



Vice-President Senior 



Varsity Squad, 
Club; Secretary E. 
Class; Sodality. 

".} regular felloiv from head to foot." 

The bearer of a name ever heard in the 
class room and also in the hall of good fellows. 
"Andy" startled many a grandstand with his 
spectacular drives through the line and, while 
not engaged in a profound discussion at Aquinas 
Club meetings, he found time to make himself 
a center of attraction for the eyes of maidens. 
He came to Loyola from St. Charles College, 
and soon won a way into the hearts of many 
by his e\'er-sunn.\" natui'e and diligence in 
siinl\". AA'f are expecting big things from him 
in the future. 

c;eorge c. sctioenberger, jr., a.b. 

"Geor(/e" 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Asso' late Editor of Maroon ; Soilalit\-; t 'lass 

Secretary. 

"And i.vhat he greatly thought he nohly 

dared." 
AVbo will I'ver forget the smiling George who 
entered Loyola hi his freshman year and imme- 
diately earned a place in the hearts of man? 
A diligent student, a practical fellow, and a de- 
termined man, is what we can say of George. 
His efforts have been felt on many occasions in 
the activities of the student body, and to him 
goes the honor of forming the College Debating 
Society. For him the (■r>stal foretells many 
things and. esperially, many more trips to 
Hnton Rnuge. 




45 



O L F, 19 2 



,/?l 



LO^'OLA UNT 




PAUL EMANUEL CLOUTHIER, 
"Cloutie" 

NACHITOCHES, LA. 



B.S. 



Sociality. 
"True as sled, sincere and independent." 
.■\n>-one knowing 'Tloutie'* could not help but 
like him. Conservative in speech, yet radiant 
in character, he has held a prominent place in 
the hearts of his fellow students. That same 
liopularity which has been his at Loyola for the 
past four years will ever be his in the years to 
come. From Broadway comes the news that he 
"rates high" with the fair sex. His record as 
a student is an enviable one indeed. He goes 
forth from Loyola with a well-molded character 
and a sincerity of purpose that will spell suc- 
cess for him in all his future undertakings. 

IVO PETERMAN, B.S. 
•■Pete" 
ALE.XANDRIA, LA. 
Treasurer Student Body Council; Class Treas- 
urer; Executive Council. 
"T/iat one small head could carry all he 
knew." 



ind 



ill learn 



Get "Pete" in an arj^ument 
little. .'Vsk him a riuestion and you will learn 
a lot. Genial to a superlative degree and an 
exceptionally good fellow, we have found him 
to be both a true friend and a con.scientious 
student. The excellent record that he has made 
in his studies and the widespread popularity 
that has been his since his coming to Loyola 
ioui- years ago. augur much for the future. 

AUBIN A. SONGV, B.S. 
"Ben" 

WALLACE, LA. 

Pi-esident of Student Body and President of 
Senior Class; Business Manager of the Maroon; 
Sodality. 

"In eulogising him we would fail to do him 
justice." 

You'll go a long way before finding another 
"Ben." Coupled with the truest of true blue 
loyalty, his qualities of administration and 
leadership have done many of the big things 
for Loyola. Since entering Loyola four years 
ago, "Ben" has ever lent his efforts towards the 
advancement of the university. Besides main- 
taining leadership in a host of organizations on 
the campus, he has established an enviable rec- 
ord in his studies and has had the honor of rep- 
resenting the Senior Class in athletics. .Ml that 
we could say would not be sufficient to manifest 
the splendor of his character. 

HERBERT WELSH, B.S. 

"Herbert" 

LAKE CHARLES, LA. 

"Dignity doth fitly adorn his personage." 

Behold a man whom we have found, after 

four years of association, to possess all those 

ciualities which endear him to all with whom 

he comes in contact. Such a man is Welsh. As 

the most dignified senior of the college, we 

think he has justly won the honor that was 

bestowed upon him by his fellow students. His 

ability measures up well to his appearance and 

he is greatly respected by all who know him. 



I Q '' 4 



Class History of Arts and Science Class 




[!T was in the middle of September, 1920, that a group of students, com- 
3? , ing from the ancient city of New Orleans or from the historic and pic- 
turesque bavous of Louisiana, entered thi" portals of Loyola L'. Green 
j Sgja ^L-A vj^ 25 (}^g proverbial freshman, filled with awe, and trembling under a thou- 
sand emotions, little did we dream of the wonderful things which would happen 
during our four years at college, or that we should be called upon to pla>' so important 
part in the meteor-like developments at Alma ^Liter. 

It has been four years of wonderful surprises, and we have passed successfully 
through all the changes and have ripened through these balmy years under most 
favorable influences. The College of Arts and Sciences, though enjoying a reputation 
of more than sixty years of successful achievemejit at the old site on Baronne street, 
was neglected during the war, while the professional departments were growing rapidly. 
During our freshman year we found but little of college spirit and student organiza- 
tion. It has been our privilege to co-operate in every movement towards the up- 
building and organizing of the powers and talents of the student body, until in our 
year of graduation we are prepared to hand o\er to the jinu'ors, who will soon take 
our places, a student body in arts and sciences that are enthused with a true college 
spirit and are loyal to their last breath to the ideals and progress of Alma Mater. 

We are proud to chronicle that our class as a body, and particularly our president, 
Ben Songy, have been strong factors in all college activities. Though as deep students 
of literature we seniors ha\e not been heroes on the athletic fields, we have supported the 
team and done much of the hidden work which is responsible for the glory of a foot- 
ball gala day. 

In the development of social activities the Senior Class has borne more than its 
share. One of the points to which the seniors look with pride is the reputation they 
have enjoyed of being not only regular good fellows, but gentlemen always and lovers 
of study and college ideals. Much of the work so ably accomplished by the Sodality 
was due to the initiative and spirit of the seniors under the inspiring leadership of 
Father J. Walsh. 

Now that the curtain is about to fall on our college days, and we must go forth to 
prove our worth in the lists of human life and struggle, we do not think it boastful 
to proclaim that wherever we may go and whatever may be our calling, we shall 
never forget our Alma Mater, nor falter in our love and zeal for her further growth 
and development. We hope to keep aloft the Loyola banner, and we shall always 
cherish the spirit which is making Loyola more wonderful every year. 



T H L '-V O L F. 1 9 



r-Ti 



,OYOLA UNIVERSr 



i;ir>-----i;i 



lf;;\ !■ 




HERMAN JOSEPH AGREGARD 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, I.A. 

'./ pilnl's pari in tahns innnni he spy'J, 
III liiuiijcrous times true icort/i is only tried.' 



ANDREW BANKS 
LL.R. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

'He diilh mitliinij hut talk nf liis luirse.' 



Dl'FOUR BAYLE 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Ilniv far thai little eaiuile ihrnivs its heai, 



EARLE J, BEOriN 

LL.li. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

7 am sure eare's an enemy to life." 



\^ 



L F, 19 2 4 



/^ 



CASPAR ROBERT BOSSETTA 
LL.B. 

NEW ORI.F.AXS, I. A. 

'Il'liali-vrr skiplir inuld iiujiiirc fur. 
For r-vi-ry ichy lie had a ivhrrcforr." 



SOL BRENER 
LL.B. 

NEW OKLEANS, I, A. 

'Ilis heart as far from fraud as heaven from 
earth." 



EMILE A. CARMOrCHE, JR. 
LL.B. 

CROWLEY, LA. 

"Is this that haiiijhty gallant gay Lothario?" 



HERBERT WILLIAM CHRISTENBERRV 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

"He is one that icilt not plead that cause 
Il'herein his tongue must he eonfuled by his 
conscience." 




49 



THi: WOLF. 192 4 



,/j) 



LOYOLA UNL 






i;K:i["^'-.{:i 



i;'r-vi 



m4 



$. 



!-;/;> 




JAMES G. COtLTON 
LL.n. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

'AVu'.t from all niilwns lumhninii al his 
back." 



SALVADOR THOMAS CRISTINA 
LL.n. 

KKNNEk, LA. 

'I'liimplr is i-Ti-r my molln. nnl rxpcJicncy." 



MICHAEL EMMET CTLLIGAN 

LL.U. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA. 

7 "u/// sit iinivn note, hnl the time ivill come 
icheii you -u/// hear it." 



AUBIN J. DAIGLE 
LL.n. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
"Rest is siL-ecl after strife." 



192 4 



Li:m (jla u 



-■ ■ , I 



GUY JOSEPH D'ANTONIO 
LL.B. 

Nl:\V ORLEANS, I,A. 

'Fnr tliy sakr, Inbacco, I ivill do auytlnnij 
hut die." 



GEORGE DASTE 
LL.B. 

XEVV ORLEANS. LA. 

"/ iun in ranii'st, I ^■ill not rrtrt'dt a sint/lr 
inch, and I ivill be lieard." 



FRANK J. DELAHOUSSAYE 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

"Tlie soul of this man is in his clothes." 



JOSEPH G. DEMPSEY, JR. 

A.B. Otorgetown. 

LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

"Divinely tall, and most divinely fair." 




T H F, WOLF, 1924 



LOYOLA UNIVERSIT 



/r^'4 




iSSeSseiisba^EisSr; 



JOSEPH F. DEYNOODT 

LL.B. 

NTiV ORLEANS, I,A. 

"lit' liird thr luxury of doiJUj /jood." 



LILLIA L. Dl'BUCH 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

'//(•/■ iiinijed Spirit is featlicrcd nflrntimrs 
1^'it/i hrtWfuly ^-ords/^ 



JOSEPH EBERLE 

LL.B. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

'/ shall he as secret as the grave." 



HENERY EDWARD FALLON 

LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

'If hose armor is his houesl thout/hl, 
hid simple truth Ins utmost skill." 



mM 



V:.!i: 



mi 



52 



'\^-' 



L F. 19 2 4 



L0\'0[.;\ LM' 



MAURICE FOl'RCADE 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

'Tlic li-nrld knows hut two, Rome and /.' 



LESSLEV P. GARDINER 
LL.B. 

SU-VSET, LA. 

'Trust not the pJiysician: his antidotes arc 
poison." 



\V. S. GRACE 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

"Full well they Uuu/h'd with counterfeited 

c/lee 
.It all his jokes, for many a joke had he." 





EDMOND LOUIS GUIDRV 

LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

"./ Frenihnian must he akvays talkiny. 
Jl'hethcr he knows anythinij of the matte 
not." 


■ or 














3 



^^^ 



T H V: \V O L F, 19 2 4 



/-?:> 



LO^'OLA UN IV 




ALFRED MILLER GUILBEAU 
LL.B. 

OPELOUSAS, LA. 
"Here is a man learned in the law." 



EDWARD A. HAGGERTY 
LL.B. 

KEW ORLEAXS, LA. 

'So long as I count tlie votes, ic/iat are you 
goinfi to do about it?" 



ALBERT SIDNEY JOHNSTONE 

LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

"Good at a fig lit. hut better at a play." 



JOHN B. JOUANDOT 
LL.B. 

\EW ORLEANS, LA. 

'/ am not only 'vjitty in myself, but the cause 
that wit is in other men." 



S+ 



'\- 



924 



H. G. KOHNKE 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEAN'S, LA. 
"I'll publish il and sliame the fools." 



JOSEPH ALOVSIUS KUCHLER 

LL.B. 

XEW ORLEANS, LA. 

"My favorite temple is an Innnhle lieart." 



C. S. LA GARDE 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

'Night after night he sat and bleared his eyes 
ivith books." 



CLARENCE J. LAUVE 
LL.B. 

ALE.VANURLA, LA. 

"Young in limbs, in judgment old.' 




T H E W O L F, 19 2 4 



LOYOLA UNIVERSIT 






UV^:*;!' 














■■Can- 
And 


\ 
1 

HARRV M. MAYO 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

lo our coffin adds a nail, no doubt, 
c^'i'ry gym so merry draws one out." 



LEO WILLIAM McCUNE 

LL.B. 

GRETNA, LA. 

'T/ie i/rratest clerks he not llie wisest men.' 



DANIEL ALLEN McGOVERN, JR. 

LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA. 

'His smile is sweetened by his c/ra-vily." 



JOSEPH F. MONIE 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

"Loud roared the dreadful thunder." 



S6 



'"^ 



F. 19 2 4 



I . L' 



U f-.| ; -^ .'' E :-' ■■_: 



VICTOR W. OLIVIER, JR. 
LL.B. 

NFW ORI, FAN'S, LA. 

"Siraiifiisl in his i'it//il/'ousin'ss.' 



STANFORD E. OWEN 

LL.B. 

WHITK CASTl.E, I,A. 

"Hi- is a /rimr of tjnod ffllmL's.' 



HERVE PAUL RACIVITCH 
LL.R. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

./ man q.v/io possissrs opinion iin,l a injill." 





AUGUST HENRY RITTER 

LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

".hid still ilw q.i'ondrr ffrenv 

iloic one small head could carry all h, 

knew." 






vy O L. F. 19 2 4 



/^^ 



LOYOLA U 









1 1; 




JOHN M. SCOTT 
LL.B. 

MORGAN CITV, [,A. 

"Talks as familiarly of roarinij lions 
.Is maids of ihirteen dn of f'lippy dnt/s." 



GEORGE D. SMART 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

'//(■ needs no eulogy: his activiiifs speak for 
him." 



ED. A. THEARD 

LL.B. 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

'Mot to knoix me argues yourselves unknoivn.' 



PAUL J. THIBERVTLLE 

LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

"In years young, yet m thought mature.' 



F, 19 2 4 



MOISE THIBODEAFX 

LL.B. 

ST. MARTINVII.I.K, LA. 

"Hi(ih-i-rcclrd tliouijlits Si-alrJ in the lirarl of 
(ourtesy." 



MARTIN TODD 

LL.B. 
NKW ORI.KANS. I.A. 

"He found lime for some l/iini/s, bill not inudi 
for play." 



IGNATIUS EDWARD IZZO 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Jl'rite me as one nx-lio lo-vcs his felloii: men.' 



JOSEPH M. VTEGES 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
'T/jy modesty is a candle to thy merit.' 




I 
■) 

-3 



59 



¥M 



THE W O L F, 1924 



/^ 



LOYOLA UNIVERSI 



(1: 




LEO R. WERTHEIMER 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
"// must he so, Ihou rrasonrst so ivelL' 



SHIRLEY GERARD WIMBERLV 

LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA. 

'/ must take heed of my conseience.' 



MILTON ALFRED WOODRfFF 
LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

"Still ixaters run deepest." 



ARTHUR L. ZAMMIT 

LL.B. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

'/ dare do all that may become a man; 
Il'ho dares do more is none." 



to 



^r 



y^- 



LO'i'OI 



\j'r 




History of tke LL.B. Class of 1924 

By F. J. i)i: la Holssave 

HREE years ago, over one hundred men and women, many of them comhig from 
the parishes of Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas, but a great majorit\' coming 
from the city of New Orleans, approached the doors of Loyola. They were seeking 
knowledge and, knowing the reputation of the great Jesuit institution, they begged 
that the institution give them an opportunity to share the wonderful store of learn- 
ing which they had given to many others. 

Most of them strangers to one another, they were admitted to the university and recognized 
all over as "Freshmen of Loyola," and after three years of work, regarded by some as hardship 
and toil and others as pastime and pleasure, these men and women have grown to know each 
other better and better, until today they are more than strangers, schoolmates or friends, but are 
known to each other as big brothers and sisters-in-law. We were very much alive and at- 
tended lectures with keen interest and pride, but our first impression of the legal profession was 
not very gratifying. Everything appeared to be dry, very little could be gathered from the 
first lectures and, at the end of a few weeks, many of the students were disappointed because the 
study of law was not the "cinch" they had expected. We then realized that the sole end of the 
law school was not solely to make lawyers, but to instill in the youth of the state a spirit which 
has been recognized all over as the greatest and sincerest spirit that has ever existed among 
men and women. The object of this is to make us good, loyal, substantial, law-abiding citizens, 
who are willing to enlighten the more unfortunate of the world. 

The election of officers caused considerable excitement among the "freshies," whence emerged 
our first president, Mr. Lavinius Williams, who was elected by an overwhelming majority. 
From that time on it was the "Ereshtnan" Class. It was thought for a time that they were going 
to run the university. When the Athletic Council failed to make necessary expenses, it was the 
Freshman Class of 1921 which came to the rescue and pulled them out of the "hole." This was 
only one of the many incidents in which the class was found to be "ONE FOR ALL AND ALL 
FOR ONE," for we were working as a unit and not individually. 

Legal rules and definitions \vere thrust at us by men who knew and were \villing to have us 
know that the legal profession was not a mere money-making profession. Our instructors took 
great interest in our cause and went far back into the dark ages and tried to impress upon us 
the importance of good law, by comparing the rules of law of hundreds of years ago with the 
now existing rules of law by which we hope to assist our fellow man. The basic principles of law 
today are the same as those of centuries ago: the eternal discrimination of right and wrong. 

Our professors were becoming interested in the raw material and were exerting every effort to 
turn out the finest of finished material which you now see before you. This was a great task. 
May we ask that they guard this as a privileged communication of an accused? One would hardly 
believe that this finished class was at one time looked upon as raw material. These men took 
great interest in our class, not solely for the love they had for the class, either as a whole or in- 
dividually, but for the love of their profession, by which they made the work a pleasure for 
us. Knowledge was thrown from wall to wall by these learned men, and so fast was It coming 
that the students soon realized that the great Loyola was no place for those who were not willing 
to work. We were shown that all men were born equal, were entitled to the equal protec- 
tion of the laws and, above all, that men had certain inalienable rights which could be abridged 
by no one, including the examiners' right to write "fail" in the lexicon of youth. 

So anxious was the class to get out into the legal world that they enacted a public mock trial, 
which attracted much attention from all over the state and whetted our appetite for legal work. 

After Christmas holidays there were absentees from our ranks. We wish to sympathize with 
them, for we realize just what they lacked or missed. It began to be seen that the study of law 

61 



WOLF, 1924 ^j) LOYOLA UN 



ii 



is a study for men and wonnen who are firmly determined to \vork not only for a degree and 
their future livelihood, but for knowledge that gratifies the service. 

Days passed on and soon we realized that our hardest task was to take our first final exam- 
ination in a legal subject. This, we are sorry to say, has proved disastrous to many students 
throughout our course. The men and women who sacrificed their pleasures, used the street car 
as a study hall to and from work, and the many whii gave up their lunch hour, excess sleeping 
hours and all their leisure time, won the reward of their work and sacrifice in victor\" all along 
the line, which they celebrated by an elaborate hanciuet unifying them socially in heart as 
legal tests had made them one compact legal unit. 

The following year the victorious unit took up the advance positions and as juniors looked 
down upon the Freshmen of 1922. We again proved our unity by electing Mr. Christenberry 
as our president, who proved himself a very worthy official. Our motto was "ONE FOR 
ALL AND ALL FOR ONE." As do all juniors, we thought we kne\v everything in the law books 
until the second year examinations loomed. 

With the barrage in full swing, and led by our capable president, wc laid siege to the posi- 
tions occupied b\' the seniors and, with great toil and effort, we finally gained their position. 
Strange and true to sa\", we ^^■ere a victorious class, with \er\" fe\v casualties. Our atnuial cele- 
bration took place and proved to be bigger and better than the first. 

The final siege was then laid for the goal, which is casually and recklessly referred to as a 
"sheepskin," but meant to us the knowledge it implies. 

Once more our class was called together to start our final struggle. As grave seniors we 
gravely selected for president Mr. Alfred Guilbeau, whose versatile and masterful capacity has 
again confirmed the unerring judgment of the Class of 1924. 

Many of the members of the class were under the impression that the last year was the 
easiest of all until the mid-term examinations fell upon us like a bombshell in the ocean. The class 
wishes to thank the professors for their "bombshells," which made each and every member open 
their eyes and prepare for the worst, for to fall down In their final \ear would certainly be dis- 
astrous to anyone who had sacrificed so much to obtain knowledge and entrance to the legal 
profession. These "bombshells" were appreciated by the class and can be evidenced by the 
fact that \'ou see before >"0u tonight men and women who took heed of this warning and suc- 
cessfully prepared and passed all the examinations, and are now ready ti receive their diplomas 
and be admitted to the bar, in soliJo if we can, or severally if we must. 

At this point we want put in the record of our history, as an asset and a guarantee, the names 
of our dear friends and professors, who have given us so generously the benefit of their wisdom. 
The class wishes to thank them jointly, severally and in soiido: Judge Cage for his patience in 
explaining the essentials of obligations; Father Kenny for teaching us our ethical duties to courts, 
clients and people; Mr. Denechaud for his elaborate explanation of the first part of the code; 
Mr. Jones and Mr. Peters for permitting us to share their knowledge of successions; Mr. Dow- 
ling for explaining the interpretation of laws; Mr. Hollingsworth for insuring our lives; Mr. 
V\'aguespack for teaching us to come into court with equit\' and clean hands; Mr. McClosky for 
I laborating on private corporations; Mr. Doyle for explaining masterfully the essentials of crime; 
Mr. Byrnes for his hearsay and persuasive evidence; Mr. Hall for city hall and municipal cor- 
porations; Mr. Rivet for his thorough explanation of the code of practice; Mr. Kernan for his 
matured wisdom on bailments and carriers; Mr. Curtis for holding his mortgage on our diploma; 
Mr. Fletchingcr for unravelling our conflicting status; Mr. Rightor for teaching us how to 
preserve our life, liberty and property under the fourteenth (i+th) amendment, despite taxation; 
Mr. Boatner for enlightening us on the constitutional law of America ; Mr. Boswell for his ad- 
mirable admiralty; Mr. Miller for his philosophic interpretation of international law. A roll 
of guarantors whom no court could dare gainsay. To all of whom we bow gratefully. 

To the University and the Jesuit Fathers, the class in soiido pledges its undying support, and 
mav thev live as long as they want, and may they never want as long as they live. 

63 



~^' 



AuRELio Ferxaxdez, D.D.S. 

"Pen'' 

"Pen" is none other than the pride of Spain. 
Candidly he is the best natured fellow \vhn 
ever ventured out on the high seas. With the 
loss of each hair our Spanish friend has 
added an English \vord to his vocabulary. 
He is nearly bald now. 



James M. Foley, D.D.S. 

"Bass" 

The proud possessor of a very handsome 
face is quite easy to look at; but, girls, take 
a tip from one who kno^vs and look further 
for the real "sheik" of the class. "Bass" loves 
the ladies about as much as anyone, but gives 
his books first consideration. 



Abel Goldfeix, D.D.S. 
'"Paf 

"Pat" is the smallest candidate for the de- 
gree, but this is one time you can't judge 
the amount of a man's work by his size. Be- 
ing with us only a year, he has made a won- 
derful record as an excellent student and a 
general good fellow. 



Howard H. Harris, D.D.S. 

■•Pollock" 

"Pollock" has ambition written all over his 
pleasing countenance, and is the most studious, 
book-loving personage who ever called Ken- 
tucky home, sweet home. If "Pollock" ever 
let an opportunity slip you can rest assured 
it was no fault of his. He is a natural born 
musician, but finds it no handicap in den- 
tistry. 




T' H F, W O L F. 



92 



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LOYOFA UNIVFl 










Dudley R. Isom, D.D.S. 

"S'u:ede" 

"Swede" can't he considered either hand- 
some, homely, or funny, hut has impressed 
us with the fact that the task has yet to pre- 
sent itself that can prove a real stumbling- 
block in his bright career. Always willing 
and ready to help a friend, "Swede" is never 
absent when there is something worth while 
going on around the U. 



George A. Juracovich, D.D.S. 

" It'ait-a-Minutc" 

"Wait-a-Minute" deserves to be congratu- 
lated on making such a splendid and im- 
pressive record at Loyola. Hard work is the 
most suitable name that could possibly be 
inserted between his other two initials. 



J.AMES C. McM.xHox, D.D.S. 

"The Irish Count" 

"Count" couldn't swing the old brogue well 
enough, so he took an extensive course in the 
Boston lingo. Between the two brogues, the 
old boy can make you sit at attention for hours 
at a time. There is nothing he can't do if he 
just tries. 



J. A. RiCH.ARL), D.D.S. 

" Pcc-iri'c" 

"Pee-wee" has them all backed off the old 
globe when it comes to exploding original 
theories. Alvery is the type of a fellow who 
will make good all right, even if he does 
seem to walk and work tn his sleep. "Pee- 
wee" says you can't le-vrn unless you ask 
questions. Well, he learns. 



6+ 



-^ 



rr> 



L0"\"0!_ 



i:\: 



Carlos Rodriguez, D.D.S. 

"MUniff/it" 

"Midnight" is nothing less than the proud 
representative of the beautiful island of Cuba. 
Carlos is a very apt student, always open to 
new ideas, letting nothing of interest pass his 
eagle eye. 

Gastox J. SoxG^', D.D.S. 

"Cajan" 

"Cajan," in his quiet, precise and business- 
like ^va\', has never beea known to raise a 
rough house, or be in the midst of one longer 
than it takes to escape. Gaston is exception- 
ally well-liked, and if quietness denotes good- 
ness, he need not \vorry about the hereafter. 

Joseph Steckler, D.D.S. 

"Terrible" 

"Terrible," always read>' with a word for 
everybody, goes on his way rejoicing as 
though nothing in the form of worry ever 
crossed his mind; and, furthermore, if good- 
natured folk, according to belief, usually be- 
come stout, Joe ought to become as big as a 
house. 



AVarren' Stricki.axd, D.D.S. 

"Jap" 

"Jap" is quiet just at the right time. That's 
the reason for his popularity with his fellow 
students. A man of few words is the way 
we have this good-natured piece of humanity 
sized up. If getting money from advertisers 
counts for anything, he'll never have to face 
starvation. 



James Tamburello, D.D.S. 

"It'op" 

"Wop" is the biggest sheik that ever 
strutted his stuff in the Loyola dental clinic. 
Look at him, girls, but don't look too long, 
unless you're out to get sheiked. If you think 
it's his good looks that captivate, you have 
another guess coming, because we've been in- 
formed differently. Ladyfolks, the whole se- 
cret lies in the twinkle of those mean eyes 
and the smoothness of that wicked line of 
love-making. 



i-y.' w ^ '^.^r.^- 




. V«,'«i:« ;' 



6s 



THE WOLF, 1924 



/^ 



LOYOLA UNIVE! 



I 




Class History of D.D.S. of 1924 



M'TEMBER, nineteen hundred twenty, found the names of sixteen fresh- 
men scrawled across the pages of Loyola's dental register. 

Twenty-three years being the average age of the class proves beyond 
^ll the shadow of a doubt that we had all been graduated from the ranks of 

fondling youth. But, alas, the shade of green we displayed would make 

the dark-hued clover hang its head in shame. After meeting our professors, scrutinizing 
the lecture and laboratory rooms, memorizing that never-to-be-forgotten first semester 
schedule, and purchasing required text-books, we herded the greenhorns for the pur- 
pose of electing officers. After a very brief session we adjourned under the worthy 
leadership of H. B. Harris. This attended to, we felt a great deal more comfortable, 
until one of the upperclassmen would hand us one of those withering looks which 
seems to be traditional among seniors. 

Returning in our sophomore year lOO per cent strong, we chose as our leader D. R. 
Isom. This being our most difficult stretch of the journey, we must hesitate here for 
a few comments on chemistry and anatomy. Long shall the Class of '24 treasure 
those memorials of our sophomore year. Believe us, we felt the mighty burden and 
are ready to recommend the above combination as the greatest reducing agent known. 

Six of the original sixteen were conspicuous by their absence at the first annual 
class meeting of our junior year, which was conducted by our newly-elected president, 
W. W. Strickland. This year we seemed to lack the spirit of old, which was more or 
less due to the loss of our class companions. Our one consolation was born when, 
after the classes had begun, two new arrivals boosted the class to a round dozen. 

This year we entered on our last lap with one other addition to our dignified ranks, 
bringing the number to the odd but lucky numeral "13." Desiring to give expression 
to our proper rank and station, the members of our exalted organization have adopted 
derbies as fitting ornaments of seniority. We have as our chief executive James Tam- 
burello, who has performed his duty wonderfully. Realizing our responsibility more 
and more each day, we have determined to make the classes that follow hustle to reach 
our mark in efficiency. 

In fraternal activities we have played a major role. Nine of our thirteen members 
are affiliated with the Psi Omega fraternity, which is the largest national fraternity 
representing our profession. Three of the above nine represented the Loynla Denial 
Journal as editor-in-chief, business manager, and first associate editor, this being the 
record for representatives from any one class since the Journal's initial publication. 

The Class of '24 is the second largest to leave Loyola. Only one left our ranks 
for other classes, while several have displayed rare judgment by coming to us from 
other parts. We are leaving with six of our fold united by the rites of matrimony, 
while three others have only "commencement" between them and the great sea of 
romance. This leaves four of the unsettled type to hang by the slender, frail, and doubt- 
ful thread of bachelorhood. 

Class Historian. 



66 



\^f 



F. 1 '^ 2 -1 



Joachim Figueroa Alvarez 

A hard working student and a good busi- 
ness m:in, who will make the drug business 
hum in his own country. 



Juan Fernando Alvarado 

"The S/irik" 

A ladies' man with a good line. His new 

store will specialize in cosmetics. He may 

tango a bit, but he is sure to get there just 
the same. 



Mike J. Artall 

"Mike" 

All are agreed that Mike is a regular fel- 
low. He is a good mixer and strong v ith 
the crowd. 



Drew M. Baker 

"The llanJy Man" 

A man of character, who makes friends 
and keeps them; who likes all girls, but loves 
his own. 




T I-! r \V C)] F 19 2 4 



yD 



LOYOLA UNIVE^? 




Joseph Billeaud, Jr. 

"Joe" 

A happy mixture of seriousness ami Irivcl- 
itv, %vho kno\vs how to mix play with hard 
v.ork. The spirit always revives when Jc^e 
appears on the scene. 



Helex M. C.'^ire 

"Hel-lum" 

Helen doesn't let her books keep her lr;>ni 
the beautiful outdoor life. She ride- in a big 
car. does her bit of dancing, has hei g;iod 
time, but, withal, is a worthy student. 



AXTHOXV E. Caxgelosi 

"Cani)" 

There is an angel in his name, and lots 
cf manliness in his make-up. His cla^s .and 
fraternity hold him priceless, and his sterling 
qualities cannot but win him fame. 



Jose Cabarga. Jr. 

A conscientious fellow, persistent in his 
work and ambitious of success. But don't 
think that Jose is a dead one. \\'hen it is 
time for fun, Cabarga is right there with 
the merriment. 



Rachel A. Carreras 

A lad}' who is as devoted to her class as 
she is to her own work; always willing and 
never failing. 



EsTELLE Coats 

"Pretty" 

A very popular girl; ambitious and will- 
ing to work for her class and her profession. 
Both will be proud of her achievements. 



Mrs. George D'Altrv 

A lady who is very clever in preparing 
prescriptions; in compounding words into 
flowing language she has no equal. It is said 
that she sometimes has the last word. 



Joseph W. Diaz 

"Heathen" 
Here is a fellow who is not afraid to let 
the world know about himself; and ^ve are 
sure the world will hear more of him. 




T H E W O L P 1^24 



y?> 



] O Y O L A ^1 N T y F r 




Nelson Paul Dugas 

"Long Boy" 

A fine fellow and a jolly good one. Very 
seldom is a good time out of his reach. What 
would the class do without "Long Boy"? 



C. J. FORKEA 

"Good Scout" 

Though Fornea would never stir up a vol- 
cano, he is a very likeable chap, and the class 
is strong for the "Good Scout." 



Caesar Perez Frutos 

One of our good friends from Cuba. The 
fact remains that he has a good head and is 
highly thought of by his classmates. 



Leslie Albert Landry 

The pharmacy department takes off its hat 
to this hard and loyal worker. The manner 
in which he looked after the affairs of the de- 
partment in the Maroon shows real ability, 
and he never failed to give the pharmacists 
a boost. 



70 



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2 4 



<^ 



! C] \' r\ !_ A I ! fM T 



Adele Marie Louapre 

"Delia" 

"Delia" is not only very loyal and reliable, 
but she is splendidly original. In the opin- 
ion of the class she is one of the best. 



Jasper Joseph Napoli 

"Nap" 

One of the stars; a man with a fine judg- 
ment and serious character; besides, he has a 
splendid sense of humor. 



Annette Phillips 

"Little Bit" 

A quiet and demure young lady, with 
laughing eyes and a quick mind. Whatever 
may come or go, "Little Bit" does her big bit 
of study and gets away with the knowledge. 



Marguerite A. Pierson 

A popular member of the class, who has 
carved out a memorable name for herself by 
her steady work and delightful disposition. 




THE WOLF, 1924 



/^ 



LOYOLA UNIVEF 



i'li: :-1l< 




Thomas Bovd Price 

"Shorty" 

As precious things are usually put up in 
small packages, it is plain that "Shorty" is a 
priceless treasure to his classmates. All like 
"Short\" with his quiet, winning wa\s, and 
all think he will he a high-priced druggist 
\'er\" shorth'. 



Maxuel Rodriguez 

••Fat Boy' 

"A merry heart maketh a cheerful counte- 
nance." "Fat Boy" always laughs and, con- 



sequently, grows fat and fatter. 



Howard Leoxce Sandoz 

"Sandy" 

There is lots of sand in "Sandy," and he 
knows how to push to the front. His serious 
energy is made delightful by his pleasant wit. 



Percy J. Theriot 

"Terry" 

One of the most popular members of the 
class. He is our Beau Brummel and the lat- 
est fashions look good on him. It "follows as 
the day the night" that the girls, too, look 
long at him and, some say, look good to him. 
But, in spite of their admiration, he does 
not lose his head. 



7* 



-^ 



El Gfcxio Martixez Villegas 

Only one ^vho has to struggle with a for- 
eign language can appreciate the noble effort 
of this earnest student. 



Doris Walsh 

"Blushing Doris" 

A real live wire in a lively class. She 
sprinkles sunshine all along her way for the 
benefit of others, and in her presence joy is 
contagious. 



RuppERT S. Whitley 

■■iFhir 

Clean-cut and snappy, "Whit" is always 
there with the goods. He is a staunch friend, 
an excellent student, a dependable leader; 
in fact, just what a class president should be. 




/■s\ 



O y n L A IJ N I V F R S T ■ 



1 NJ ii 







F, 1 Q ? 4 



r\ -■' r'\ I A I i N' I \,' ! '-' ■ I 



Francis Flvnn 



P. A. Gaudet 



Gardere Moore 




75 



T H F. W O L F. 19 2 4 



/•Ti 



LOYOLA UNIVERSI 




Albert S. Bcmsfoxtaine 



Edwixa E. Rreckwoldt 



William Brewkr 



James N. Brittixgham 



G. Gerxox Browx 



Fraxk T. Cass 



Q 7 J 



Arthur M. Curtis 



Charles A. Danxa 



DoxATiox Daxc 



AxTHON'v Di Carlo 



Ralph R. Hagex 



Ralph E. Harris 




77 



H E WOLF. 1924 



y-?> 



LOYOLA V 



s 



li i:-lH 



m. 



i|r 







Lamar P. Harrison 



Albert P. Grandzin 



Victor J. Gros 



JOSEPH B. Lancaster 



Robert E. Mahoxey 



Grandisox Mitchell 



78 



woi.r. . \'^)i4 



.-: :v) 



LO \ 'J LA L' ;i ! 






DeiMpsie D. Newman 



Mildred G. Nulty 



Joseph W. Porter 



Alex P. Rouly 



Jacob Schaaf 



Raoul Sere 











79 



T 1-i F, V^' O 1 , 'r\ 19 2 4 



y^ 



, O \' m A .U N T V F R S T 



iKi: 




JOHX E. UXSWORTH 



Grover C. Vidrine 






92 4 



/y'l 



i..o\'OLA, uf-irv-tiisrr 



WlLTZ J. EmIMER 



Wanda De Pomorski 



E. J. Armand 



H. M. Laufer 



Victor Ledhetter 



Leopold Levy 




7^ L! l-~ ^T/ O IP 1 Q ? 4 



y5> 



LOYOLA 




Elliott Jacobs 



Raymond Cervera 



E. B. Eastburn 



A. E. Smith 



M. A. Theriot 



8z 



^ 19 2 4 



L O Y Q: : 



Mrs. C. Anoei.ette 



Alma Bautovich 



Paul Andre Bechet 



Antoine Joseph Braqiet 



William F. Coop 




83 



THE WOLF, 1924 



/r) 



LOYOLA 




Camilli s ToHx Fabacher 



IMarie T- Fabacher 



Harriet C. Grace 



Staxley C. Hava 



Marie Louise Harvey 



'■^- 



1 924 



■T) 



LO"VO' 



William J. Hebert 



Clyston Lemoixe 



Louis Prejeax 



Sa:\iuel Ricca 



Leo B. Schvvegmaxx 




T H E W vO L F. 19 2 4 

r 



/^ 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 







E. A. Smith 



Maria Urrutia 



Ellis A. Wallexberc 



Charles Walcott 



Richard P. Williamson 



F. 19 2 4 



! ('' \ ' tl . '' I 









-M 



T M E W O L F. ! 9 2 4 



y^ 



LOYOLA UNIVERSIT' 




Gi V F. Bern'ard 



KiRTLEY BOUDREAU 



Joseph A. Cerniglia 



Sam L EL Cerxiglia 



Philip S. Clark, Jr. 



^^ 



I C) 



Harold A. Dempsev 



Maurice J. Hartson 



William J. Hebert 



Bertram LaBruyere 



Anthony Mlller 




ri I r 1 q 7 4 



J'^^ 



I O Y O I A 1 1 N T 



s?r5^£!y-- 




JoHX O'Keefe 



Fraxk p. Perret 



Louis Picheloup 



J. A. CoMEAUX, Jr. 



Fraxcis Harrison 



^, 



:> L F, 19 2 4 



•^> 



n '-■■: n 1 , A I 



O. K. Mayo 



Wallace M. Nicaud 



NoRRERT E. PeRRET 



B. T. Recio 



Victor B. Stassi 



Peyton Tunstall 




T H I^ W O L: F. I 9 ? 4 



,/'f> I - O Y O L A VNl ^/ F 



?a 



D 



3 
FD 



J _ 




Ml 


M 




q ? 4 



LQ^'OL A ^,. i ! ; v/ ;-:, ; ; :j JT 



Francis M. Billiu 



Werxer Bourgeois 



LlOVD J. RrdI SSARD 



M. A. BrOU SSARD 



Arthir Brue 



Gallier Capdevielle, Jr. 



G. Price Crane 



Bernard A. Dempsey 




THE WOLF, 192 4 



/^ 



LOYOLA 




JOHX DULLEXTY 



J. MiLTOX FlEL'RIET 



Cl.IFFORl) GeXDROX 



Philip H. Giuffre 



R. Jerry Glass 



HEXR-i P. Griggs 



Alfred E. Hannemann, Jr. 



Walter C. Haxxemaxx 



W 



f^, I 9 2 ^ 



LOYOLA L;N{ VL, f<SI") 



John Holmes 



James Howard 



Francis Kammer 



Harry Kinsella 



Wheeler Lucas 



J. P. Macaluso 



James P. Markey 



Lee Novo 




T i-i r \x^ n I , F, 1 Q 2 4 



y^ 



LOYOLA UNIVERSI 




Hexrv O'Connor 



Rodney Reed 



Emile Rive 



A. D. Smith 



Edwin Vega 



James J. Wol lfe 



Albert S. Yenni 



Charles M. Yenni 



96 



92 4 



LcrVOL A L [I I V'l;, Iw ! 'l" 



Charlf.s W. Adams 



Llovd J. Adams 



Fraxk J. Beier 



Fraxcis X. Rexetz 



Lawrexce W. Bergerox 



Edward ]\I. Boagxi 



Sidxev J. Boldreaux 



G. C. CONXOLV 




97 



T H F: W O ! . F. 19 2 4 



/?) 



LOYOLA L 




Simon C. Colrrege 



Joseph E. Douglas 



Claii) de Baroxcelli 



John J. Dutel 



Miss Bernice Exglert 



JoHX |. FiXXORX 



William J. Gallagher 



(iEorge W. Gill 



1 Cj 2 J 



James P. Glii.i.ot 



Eylieff W. Hansen 



Steven C. Hartel 



Marx Jeffer 



Brittmar p. Landry 



Albert A. Levy 



Clovis Laprairie 



Albin M. Lemoine 




99. 



THE WOLF, 1924 



y?> 



LOYOLA UNIVE 




Charles W. Matherxe 



Herman' L. Midlo 



Pierre Morere 



Charles A. Mumfrey 



David p. Nicoll 



Miss Mary H. Lorixe 



Elkix Rlbexstein 



Jos. A. Rlbexstein 



I 924 



(") \ n 



GUSTAVE SCHOE.VAGEL 



MOSEMAN R. SiMOXEAUX 



Jewel S. Simmoxs 



John A. Smith, Jr. 



Miss Esther Stein 



Norman R. Tilden 



AIariox J. Tortorich 



Miss Mary Anne Van Geffen 




^:^m 



mm\ 



T }-[ Ii \\' O L F, 19 2 4 



/?) 



LOYOLA UNIVEF 




A. J. ROL RKE 



Joseph G. Viosca 



Louis J. Vives 



Hen'rv J. Voss 



Nan S. Warxer 



F, 19 2 4 



{J I 1.1 ] ^ L'^ 



S. C. Allem.ax 



C. Arias 



L. P. Broussard 



A. R. De Nux 



R. DOLESE 



H. Edrixgton 



N. Gastox 



F. J. Haxlev 




103 



T U f W O L F ! "^ 2 4 



r'~> 



r.OYOi A I 




M. Laufer 



L. F. Maumus 



J. F. MOUTON 



J. C. Nolan 



A. PiCARD 



J. S. Robin 



C. A. VOORHIES 



A. R. Whitley 



THE W O L F, 1924 






,0\OLA U ■■ ]^' KKil'i" 



BoRRIS BlRK 



Clarexce Exglert 



Benedict T. Triche 



Joseph M. Greenbero 



Waverly Hexxixg 



Joseph D. Hylaxd 



Peter F. Jones 



J. J. Kexny 




KPiii 



THE WOLF, 1924 



,/:^ 



i■'t■---^^'■i 



i j - . • i . 



ri ':':■-:;>■; I' 



mm 







LOYOLA 


UNI\ 














Rali'H Lampert 
Emmet F. Philbin 





Ferrel J. ROUSSEL 



RussEL J. St. Paul 



Joseph O. Schwartz 



Joseph H. Richard 



A. A. Steixer 



1 06 




/N which the reader is given an opportu- 
nity to sec our games and sports, arid to 
become acquainted Hfith those la^ho, by 
proving themselves in these events, have made 
them rvhat they are. 







^SflB^B .i^'' 


mm 




mrM 




ItBIII 


^Vj^SBi^H. '^' 


mill 


Er^^ 


VI IP' 



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ItBIII 

mill 

VI IP' 


1 


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s 






CHAPTER THREE 

ATHLETICS 



L!iliill!IIFWIll'lir!"illlllll|lllll|[!llll|iillll|W!lllllii[[|l!ll||l!lllllllll!ll|i||l!P!i| 



LOYOI.A U 




H/Mltf 



109 



THE W O L F, . I 9 2 4 



LOYOLA UNIV 



il 








P^£^i 


i 


•j-'^. '^-'■' 




Mm 
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1 
i 



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m::--: 



I 



p 




S. D ANTONI 



V^, 



92^ y-y \_Aj\ 0L.^\ 



A Loyal Alumnus 




'HAT the student body of Loyola University owes 
to the creative spirit of loyalty and generosity, 
which has made Mr. B. S. D'Antoni the idol of 
Loyola men, cannot be told in words. 
His far-seeing mind planned the organization of Loyola's 
forces for greater athletic opportunity, and his liberality made 
possible the almost miraculous development of Loyola's splen- 
did campus, where its Gymnasium Hall and Stadium stands. 
Mr. D'Antoni's loyal love of Loyola and her student body 
IS surpassed only by his kindliness and modesty, which lend a 
charm to his character and make him "one of the boys." 



TH-E WOLF. 1924 



y^ 



LOYOLA UNI 



i 




BILL FLVN'X, BILL DALV 



W O L F. I '> 2 4 



/oyoia 



la Coacn 



acnes 




OXFROXTEI) with th? task of building athletics on a high plane at 
Loyola, William K. Flynn tackled an almost superhuman job upon his 
arrival in our midst three years ago. But in that short time, "Hill" has 
worked wonders. 

With absolutely nothing to start upon, Flynn met with difficulties that would 
have discouraged many another less determined and able coach. He moulded his 
limited material into a grid machine that carried Loyola's colors for the first time 
back in igai. 

That was but the start. The 1922 eleven was far stronger and Flynn placed one 
of the finest teams in this section on the field last fall. 

Always a "pal" as well as a leader of his men. Bill Flynn, although he has passed 
over the coaching duties to "Moon Ducote," uill forever be remembered as the man 
who started football and all sports at Lo\'ola. 

A graduate of Holy Cross, where he was a teammate of Flynn, fortune pitted 
Bill Daly against his old buddy in the first game that either had participated in as a 
coach. Daly, coaching St. Charles, defeated Flynn, then making his debut as a 
Loyola coach. 

All Loyola, remembering that defeat, welcomed the announcenunt that Bill Dah' 
had joined the Wolves' coaching staff. 'Twas better to ha\e him with us than "agin" 
us. 

Daly made a great record as coach of Jesuits High before coming to Loyola, and 
during the year that he has coached the ^Volves his fine spirit and leadership have 
been apparent in the success of the team. 



''ii 



X13 



\\ (■ 



I_ O vol A TJNT\/r' R <^T 



(C-: 



1923 Sckedule 



Loyola 
Loyola 
Loyola 
Loyola 
Loyola 
Loyola 
Loyola 



36; Louisiana Normal O 

1 9 ; Springhill 6 

33 ; Marion o 

10; University of Dallas O 

o; Tennessee Medics o 

6 ; Louisiana Polytech 28 

13; Louisiana College 6 



(■■;''j.' 




W' O L F. 19 2 4 



LO 



I V L. 1- 



1924 Sckedule 

October 4 — Centenary At Shreveport 

October 1 I — Springhill At New Orleans 

October 17 — Mississippi Normal At New Orleans 

October 25 — Oglethorpe At New Orleans 

November i — Mercer At New Orleans 

November 8 — Tennessee Doctors At New Orleans 

November 16 — Camp Benning At New Orleans 

November 22 — Georgetown At New Orleans 

Thanksgiving — Louisiana Polytech At New Orleans 



iMJInwni 



iAliiiliSil 




■^;fa:c ^jgfa ^m^^^ iS*— *- 



"S 



1-1 1^ \\/ O i ]■■■ 19/4 



yz) 



I OYOIA 1 




ii6 



\\' iJ L F. 19 2 4 



On tke Gridiron 




W'li.iiAM K. Fi.VNN Coach 

William Dalv hshtant Coac/i 

I'.wELL A. Smith Captain 

I.KSLiE CJardn'er Manager 

Squad llaiks — F.u i: i.L S.\mii IIakold W'inling, Robert 
White, PnMixicK Domem:eal:.\, Cecil (Sirsox, Lastie 
Hroussari), Lester IIebert, James Babikgtox, and Wallace 

NlCAUl). 

Ltnrnicn — Jn]i\ iNswoRrii, Jeff Curtis, Joseph Tumin- 
i:llo, EinviN CiuiDR'i , Albert Burgieres, Joseph Nolan, Jofin 
Carroll, Robert Ross, L. D. Dunbar, Sam Cerkiglia, Archie 
Caudet, Joseph Cabrera, Dennis Morvant, Philip Tomew, 
A\i) Raymond Stulb. 




mIVE victories, a tie and one defeat is Loyola's record for the 1923 foot- 
ball sea.soii. Victories were registered over Louisiana Normal, Spring- 
hill, ALarion, Dallas, and Louisiana College. The result of the game 
with the Tennessee Medical School was a nothing-nothing tie. The only 
defeat was administered by Louisiana Polytcch. Only one loss nut of 
seven games in our third season on the gridiron. 

The team started off strong this 5'ear and seemed to gain in strength and effective- 
ness as the season progressed. The season was centered around the game with the Ten- 
nessee Medicals. Every preceding gami- led uyi to that contest, as every receding 
game seemed to lead away from it. 

The first contest was scheduled with Louisiana Xormal. As it turned out, how- 
ever, there was no contest — Loyola had everything her own way. The score at the 
end of the fourth period was 36-0 in favor of the Wolves. The victory dedicated our 
new stadium in a fitting style. Loyola displayed two teams, both effective in their at- 
tacks and impregnable in their resistance. The offense of the Loyola team was dis- 
tinguished by the broken-field running of "Duce" Domengeaux, the plunging of Harold 
Winling, and the accurate kicking of Broussard. Unsworth and Curtis stood out in 
their respective line positions. 

Springhill reported for her defeat promptly at 2 o'clock on Sunday, October 21. 
They were not disappointed, but were sent back to Mobile flaunting the small end 
of a 19-6 score. Captain Bill Smith regained his 1922 form in this game and, to- 
gether with Harold Winling, they tore through the lighter Springhill line for gain 
after gain. It was due to their excellent work that the Wolves ran up nineteen points. 
The visiting team threw quite a scare into our boys when they opened up a forward 
passing attack in the final period of the game and scored their only touchdown. Our 
team showed a woefully weak defense against the aerial attack and probably had 
Springhill resorted to this method of offense sooner, the score would have been much 
closer. 

The following week found our Wolves facing the light but fast team from ^Llrion 
Institute. Once again Coach Fl\nn displaced two well-balanced teams. The second 



HE Vi/ O L F\ 19 2 4 



y^ 



LOYOLA UNIVERSr 



n- 










team showed up as well as the first, scoring two touchdowns and paving the way 
for a third, placing the ball on the five-yard line for the varsity to carry over. The 
first eleven scored two more touchdowns for a total of i^ points for Loyola. The 
Wolves met with little opposition. The Marionites, though fighting every inch of the 
way, were unable to stop the advances of Winling, Domengeaux, White, and the 
other Loyola backs. Again the Wolves seemed unable to solve or to stop a forward 
pass attack. One such attack carried the enemy dangerously close to our goal, but the 
team rose to the occasion and frustrated all further attempts. The final score was 
33-0. Joe Nolan played a stellar game at end. 

During the week that followed the Wolves were worked early and late in prepara- 
!'; ': li.l tion for the strenuous middle of their schedule. On Novembr 3, Dallas University 

; :_ 'j I opened athletic relations with us in a game here. The game was played on a muddy 

■ i :,i field, which impeded the play of both elevens. However, there was no difficulty in 

' j;..li:. Ij selecting the better team. In the first few miiiuts of play the Wolves carried the ball 

yVfi'/-' -il over for what turned out to be the only touchdown of the game. "Duce," our quarter- 

back, sent Winling, Smith and Hebert hurling through the enemy line, and confused 
the Steers by grabbing the pigskin at an unexpected moment and skirting the end for a 
short gain. This attack carried the ball to the five-yard line, where Winling took it 
over. After this Loyola played the game safe and repeatedly punted on the third 
down. The Dallas backs could do little against our line, completing not one first 
down in the first half. In the second half our team was again helpless before a forward 
pass attack. Using this method of advance, the Dallas boys advanced within scoring 
distance of our goal on several occasions. But always the Loyola fighting spirit cropped 
forth in time to ward off a score. Johnny Unsworth, Jeff Curtis and Al Burgieres 
showed up exceptionally well in these crises, though the credit for stopping the Texans 
is due to all eleven men. In the final quarter, Loyola started another drive that cul- 
minated in Unworth's neat placement kick from the twenty-yard line. The final 
score was lo-o. 

And then came THE game of the season, the game for which every player had been 
earnestly preparing since the first day of practice. It was going to be the test of the 
Loyola team. Neither team had been defeated up to then ; the enemy had not been 
defeated in the last three years. During those three years they had amassed victories 



118 



I 924 



( ) ii 




over some of the best teams in the South. Could our Wolves stop such a formidable 
team? Among the personnel of the visiting team were White, Sanders, Raine, Doaic, 
McLoughlin, Payne, and other figures prominent on the gridiron. It was the first 
time this season that our team had been outweighed. 

"Ready, Medics. Ready, Loyola." Three thousand fans prepared themselves for 
sixty gruelling minutes of exxitement. After receiving the ball on the kick-ofi, Ten- 
nessee was forced to kick. Loyola then began an impressive march down the field. 
After one first down, the drive was stopped. The Medics could do little against our 
line in the first half, Unsworth and Company holding them for downs at every attempt. 
Towards the end of the first quarter, "Duce" Domengeaux, aided by perfect interfer- 
ence, got loose for a fifty-yard run. The fleet-footed Sanders overhauled him on the 
Medicos' twenty-yard line. At this point the quarter ended. 

The second quarter began with the ball in Loyola's possession on the Medics' 
twenty-yard line. At this point Loyola began her drive that carried her to the very 
brink of a touchdown. With Winling and Smith carrying the ball alternately, the team 
fought its way to the one-yard line with two downs to go over. Captain Smith was 
elected to carry it over. Bill's plunge carried him well over the final white marker, 
but in the heat of the play the ball was fumbled. Tennessee recovered the bounding 
pigskin and punted out of danger. 

In the third quarter the Wolves weakened under the terrific physical and mental 
strain and before they realized it they were struggling inside their ten-yard mark. 
One plunge, two plunges, and the shadow of the goal post grew thicker and darker. 
A third plunge and the ball was resting on our one-yard line. The day looked black 
for us. White was allotted the task of carrying it over. He hurled his two hundred 
pounds through the air in a magnificent attempt. He was caught in mid-air by a half 
dozen waiting Wolves and flung back to his starting place. The crisis had been passed. 

The game was nip and tuck after this, except for a beautiful bit of football dis- 
played by Harold Winling. A kick was called for. The pass to Harold was a poor 
one and before he could set himself for the kick, the opposing ends were rushing on 
him. With characteristic quickness of thought, Harold tucked the ball under his arm 
and skirted the entire opposing team for a seventy-yard gain. The advance was cut 



T H E \X^ O L F, 19 2 4 



/^ 



LOYOLA UNIVER 



ifyip. 






i>m 



Hi-:: \ 




down to thirt\-five yards when the umpire, despite the adverse decision of the head 
linesman, insisted that Winling had stepped out of bounds. 

Hoth teams resorted to the forward pass in a desperate last-minute attempt to score, 
but neither was successful. Our team showed decided improvement in this depart- 
ment of the game, completing five out of nine attempts against their opponents' one 
out of eight. Though we failed to defeat the Medics, our team left no doubt in th? 
minds of those who witnessed the game as to whicli was the superior eleven. 

Harold Winling displayed the finest exhibition of football that has ever been wit- 
nessed on a New Orleans gridiron. He was in every play, giving interference, buck- 
ing, end-running, and backing up the line — in all, playing football such as football is 
seldom played. His punts averaged 47 yards. Following this game, Winling received 
prominent mention for a berth on the South's mythical all-star eleven. 

The reaction that followed this game was disastrous, and resulted in our only ilefeat 
of the season. Louisiana Polytech defeated our team in Alexandria by the score of 
28-6. Loyola displayed just the reverse of thi' form that had startled the Tennessee 
Medical team. Johnny Unsworth, the steadying and directing influence in the line, 
was out of the game with a broken hand sustained in the Medics' game, johnin's 
comrades in the line seemed lost without Johnny in there to advise them, and the 
result was the 28-6 defeat. 

In the final game of the season, against Louisiana College, we find a crippled eleven 
representing Loyola. According to an agreement between the two coaches, the game 
was to be played according to S. L A. A. rules. As a consequence, all the first-year 
men on the Loyola squad were barred from playing. Among those who were thus lost 
to the team were Winling, Domengeaux, Broussard and Burgieres. 

"Gibby" (jibson, who had been handicapped all season with a bad foot, celebrated 
his return to the game with a sensational sixty-yard run that proved the deciding factor 
in the game. This run came towards the end of the first half. "Ciibby" received a 
punt on his own forty-yard line and squirmed and dodged through the entire hostile 



i 924 



V u 




team tor Loyola's sfcond touchdown. This hit of football recalled to many a similar 
run b\- Cjibson that decided the outcome of the Loyola-L. S. LJ. game two years ago. 

The first touchdown was the result of the line plunging of Smith and Hebert. Smith 
carried the ball over on the first play of the second quarter. The final score of the 
gam? was 13-7 in favor of our Wolves. 

This game drew to a close the most successful season that Loyola can boast of. 
Too much praise cannot be showered upon those youths who gave so much of their 
time to zealous practice and who played so hard and so cleanly as to draw the admira- 
tion and respect of all the opposing teams and their coaches. We cannot forget 
Coaches Flynn and Daly, whose co-operative coaching gave us a contender on the 
gridiron. 



T H F: ^?^^ Q L F, 19 2 4 



.r?) 



LOYOLA UNIVERSIT 



I • I. ■■ :.| 



II: 




Rudolph Domexgeaux 

Called "Deuce" by the world at large. 
Peppery quarterback and, as can be judged 
by his given name, somewhat of a "sheik." 
The Freshman A.B. Class claims him. 



Lester Herbert 

The official handy-andy man of the team. 
Can do most anything and do it well, as 
not only the coach but also the Sophomore 
A.H. profs will aver. 



Cecil Gibson' 

"(jibbv" was kept out most of the past 
season because of a bad foot, but the few 
times that he did get in he showed the same 
old form that beat L. S. U. 7-0 last year. 
He'll be in the backfield and in the Junior 
A.B. Class next year. 



F, 19 2 4 



Al Rlrruieres 

The Wolves are thanking their stars 
that AI is with lis and not agin us, as he 
completely wrecked them in the first foot- 
ball game Loyola played three years ago. 
However, he is safely tucked in the Arts 
and Science School for a couple of more 
years. Mentioned as all-state tackle this 
season. 



Archie Gaudet 

Here we have a versatile member of the 
Junior B.S. Class, who debates, plays end, 
center, or does most anything else well. 



Sam Cerxiglia 

Get your man or he'll get you, is Sam's 
philosophy, and he has got many more than 
got him in two seasons with the Wolves. 
In two more years he'll get a Ph.B. degree 
and quit playing football. 




3 L F. 



lOYOI A IJNTVER 



e^m 



ii 




Joe N'olax 

Someone said something about being born 
to blush unseen, and it applies to Joe, who 
has done more work with less noise than 
any member of the squad. Played every 
minute of every game and is coming back 
for more next year. He is president of the 
Freshman Dental Class. 



Lastie Broussard 

Another one of the freshmen who has 
made quite a name in his first year on the 
^Volves. Perfectly at home at quarter or 
half, he carries a deadly toe for drop and 
place kicks. 



JoHx Carroll 

Known as "Di.xie" and has a passionate 
craze for football and — , well, most other 
sports. The Sophomore Ph.B. Class and 
the "beanery" take up most of his time. 



I ':* 



Jeff Curtis 

More intimately and strikingly known by 
backs that have tried to come around his 
end. Quiet Jeff goes about his business 
without much ado, but he's there, boys, he's 
there. Another of the Wohes' all-state 
men from the Sophomore Law Class. 




John Unsworth 

Said to tackle sophomore law subjects as 
hard as opposing backs. He has been a 
bulwark in the Loyola line for two seasons 
and is one of the most popular Wolves on 
the field. All-state tackle. 



Joe Ti'MixErj.o 

A second-year dentist and tackle. Takes 
out teeth with the same ease as opposing in- 
terference. 




I2S 



T H E W O L F, 19 2 4 



^1) 



LOYOLA UNIVER: 



I, , f - 




Bob White 

An ex-captain, but still one of the leaders 
of the squad. Besides being a punter ex- 
traordinaire, Bob is a cool, heady back and 
a disagreeable man to run into on the grid- 
iron. A Junior A.B. stude. 



Raymond Stulb 

One of the prominent Stulb brothers. He 
is in the Sophomore B.S. Class during the 
week, playing end on Saturdays. 



X26 



WOLF. I 



Tke Fresni 



resnies 




The first freshman football team of Loyola was one 
of the foremost steps in the University's great climb to 
athletic recognition in the South. While its record is 
not \ery impressive, yet it has bright features. In four 
games played, the Wolf Pups came out on the losing 
end each time, but on each occasion the difference was 
less than fourteen points: Gulf Coast Military Acad- 
emy, 19-6; Jefferson, g-6 ; L. S. U. Freshmen, 13-0; 
Audubon, 6-0. Remembering that these were some of 
the strongest smaller teams in this section, the Freshies' 
record is not disgraceful. 

Fhe season opened with Gulf Coast Military 
Academy. The Wolf Pups were the first to score. 
With the ball on their ten-yard line, (nilf Coast at- 
tempted to punt out of danger, but the kick was 
blocked, and Maunia, Loyola's left em\. recovered and 
ran seven yards for a touchdown. This lead the Freshies held until the middle of the 
second quarter, when successive line plunges by Cnilf Coast's heavy backs accounted 
for a score. The half ended with Gulf Coast in the lead, 7-6. 

The third quarter was scoreless, but the final chapter found the military boys 
pushing over two more touchdowns, each time failing to kick goal. 

The following week the Wolf Pups encountered the Jefferson College eleven. As 
in their opening game, the Freshies were the first to score. After a series of end runs 
and line bucks by Rive, Woulfe, and Smith, the latter carried the ball over. For 
three quarters the score stood unchanged, with the oval continually in Jefferson ter- 
ritory The fourth quarter, however, proved disastrous to the Pups. First one and 
then the other of their plavers was injured, until the casualty list ran up to seven, and 
seven second-string men had to be rushed into the fray. Thus with a patched-up and 
crippled opponent, Jefferson managed to squeeze over a touchdown and even the score 
at 6-6. 

The miiuites were fast flying by and it looked as though the score would be a tie, 
when with two minutes to go the Convent team recovered a fumble on Loyola's twenty- 
yard line. After three attempts to gain had been frustrated, Kelly, who had borne the 
burden of the Jefferson attack all afternoon, stood on Loyola's tvventy-five-yard line and 
drop kicked the ball between the uprights, bringing the score to 9-6, which was the final 
total. 



127 



THE WOLF, 1924 



y^ 



LOYOLA UNI 




The Baby Tigers of \,. S. U. were the next opponents of the Wolf Pups. Play- 
ing on a field of mud, the freshmen, for three quarters withstood the powerful attack 
of the hea\ier enemy without yielding an inch, outplaying their opponents for the most 
pait. In the final quarter, however, as in their previous games, the Pups weakened 
under the strain and L. S. U. crossed the goal line twice, winning the game, 1 3-0. 

The final game of the season was with the strong Audubon team. From the open- 
ing whistle, the game was a nip and tuck affair with neither team having much of an 
advantage, the ball being in midfield throughout. Audubon was the first to score. In 
the second quarter, Lombard, flashy Audubon halfback, managed to sli|i through the 
freshmen defense for a touchdown, the only score of the game 

Its percentage column, however, was not the boast of the freshman squad. It was 
in its material for next year's varsity that it took special pride. 

W.-^LTER Mc)L()N"i', captain and right tackle, is perhaps the best prospect for a var- 
sity team that an\' freshman squad in this section can boast of. His all-round playing 
ard leadership were the chief factors in keeping the scores of the opponents low. A 
consistent, hard working, fighting fellow, "Mai" was the star of every game. A gen- 
tleman off and on the field, he commanded the respect and allegiance of every man 
0!i the squad. 

Next in line of notables among the freshmen was JoHX Holmes. This big guard 
shared the limelight with his captain in e\ery game. His consistent good playing at- 



"^ 



V/ O L. F. 19 



tiactci! the atti-ntion of tlic \arsity coaches ami Jnlinrn is coimtcil upon as a hue pros- 
jicct tV r 1(124. 

Emile Ri\'E. flash)- halfback, ranks next to Hohncs in the matter of beinsi a pros- 
pect for the 1924 varsity. Stockily built, though light in weight, Emile bore a great 
burden of the offensive work of the freshmen. His long skirting end runs or flashy 
oft- tackle sprints marked Rive as a man to be always feared by the opposition. Fleet, 
elusive and brainy, Emile should prove a great asset to the varsity in his sophomore 
year. 

A I). Smith brother of Captain Hill of the \arsity, upheld the family reputation 
on the freshman squad. Being the heaviest man in the hackfield, he carried prac- 
titalh the whole burden of the line pliuiging, and bore it admirabh' Besides, A. D. 
did all the kicking for the Pups, and it was his toe which repeatedly turned th? ene- 
my back when they threatened seriously. 

Other stars there were on the first frehsman football team of Lo\ola but they were 
only smaller satellites and did not shine as brilliantly as the aforementioned. These 
were: Philip Clark, Cy Griggs, Harry Kinsella, "Fats" Accardo, Billy Coyle, Joe 
Dardis, John Borrodale, John O'Keefe, Joe Billeaud. Anthony MuUer, Jimmy 
Woulfe, Henry Maumus, Celly Morriz, Clifford Gendron. 

Freshman" Schedule 

Loyola 6; (julf Coast Alilitary Academy ig 

Loyola 6 ; Jefferson College 9 

Loyola o; L. S. L'. Freshmen 13 

Loyola o; Audubon 6 



:' O L. F. 19 2 4 



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1.0\'0LA. IJNT\ 






m- 




Vy O L F, I ^1 ^ 4 



Rickard 'Moon' Ducote 




E^V art tlu-rc in the Si)uthlaiul who ha\c not heard (jf Richard Ducote. 
Known in sportlaml as "Moon" Ducote, he has won fame both as a 
player and as a coach ot toothall, basketball and baseball. 

He be;j;an his athletic career at Sprinj^hill Colleiie, an institution 
that he attended for nine vears. He later became the mainstay on the Auburn L ni- 
versit\' football team. He won his greatest fame as a fullback of the famous Cleveland 
\a\al Reser\e. On this team his spectacular jilaying was broadcasted by the press of 
the entire countr\', and from east to west, from north to south, the sport sheets bore 
the name of Richard "Moon" Ducote. 

He returned to Spruighill to beLjin his career as a c(iach. He de\eloped teams that 
have put Springhill in tlu' class with the leading college and vini\ersity teams of the 
South. Auburn, \'anilerbilt, (u'orgia Tech, (leorgetown and a host of other leading 
uni\ersities soon laitl claim to toothall stars that had been trained at Springhill 
under the skilful guidance of "Moon" Ducote. As an e\)ierienced basketball jilayer 
he was able to develop some of the best quintets that ha\e played on south;'rn courts. 
In baseball great things could naturally ha\e been expected of the teams h:' coached. 
Added to his intrinsic knowledge of the game, he had the experience of a Southern 
League phuer to give to those whom he coached. 

His ability as a gridiron mentor became known throughout the countr\, and he 
was appointed coach of Louisiana State Uni\ersity with his former coach at Auburn, 
Mike Donohue. He also handled the Tiger basketball and baseball teams. 

But today another university lays claim to him. He has come to Loyola to estab- 
lish a greater record as a coach, to outdo his fame as a football mentor. 



T hi y W O L F. I Q 2 -I 



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LO\'OLA u 




Cheer Leaders 



SnaKe Ddace 



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THE W O L F, 192 4 



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LOYOLA U 



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Loyola s First Real Basketball Team 






■>::Sk(?. 






We say this with all due respect to that 
sturdy bunch of pioneers of three seasons 
ago that braved the hardships of the be- 
ginner in the athletic world and set out 
to conquer an humble portion of that 
sphere. The faint traces that they left to 
their successors were allowed to disappear, 
and this year's squad had to break the 
ground again. The 1924 basketball squad 
was Loyola's first real, whole-hearted at- 
tempt on the basketball court. They 
played the best teams in the South, and in 
every game, Avhether winner or loser, im- 
pressed upon their opponents that they 
■were a real team. 

Their record for the season is ten games 
won and ten games lost — a fifty- 
fifty break. Quite a creditable 
performance w'hen one glances 
over the formidable teams that 
they have met. A two-game se- 
ries was won from the Knights 
of Columbus. A four-game se- 
ries was won from Springhill. 
Single victories were won over 
the Gymnastic Club, Southwest- 
ern; McGowin's Lyons of Mo- 
bile, and Centenary. Series were 
lost to Mississippi University (2 
games) ; L. S. U. (4 games) ; 
St. Stanislaus (2 games) ; and 
Mississippi College (2 games). 
None of the series was divided. 
All were won either by Loyola 
or by the opponents. 

The difficulties that faced Coach 
Abe Goldberg in forming a squad 
out of new and untried material, 
of building up a team with no 
foundation to build on, these dif- 
ficulties only a coach who has 
faced the same situation can ap- 
preciate. The result of his work 
we can point to proudly. He 
turned out a team that was wor- 
thy in every sense of the word 
of representing Loyola. 

The defense of the Wolves Avas 
their strongest point. 'Lhey resorted to the five-man defense that most of the teams are adopting. 
The Wolves' five-man defense has been the Waterloo of many "a Avonderful team" during the 
past season. We might remark here on the wonderful spirit of sportsinanship displayed by our 
boys in every game. 

The Wolves opened the '24 season by winning handily from the Knights of Columbus club, 
30-27. The game was closely contested from start to finish. The Caseys started the scoring 
and ran up a substantial lead in the beginning of the game. Towards the end of the half, Win- 
ling and Dantnni began a rallv that whittled away the K. C. lead. Rive put his team within 



134 




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three points of the opponents liy caging two neat field 
goals at the close of the perioil. The score stood 20-17 
when the two teams faced each other at the beginning of 
the second period. By steady playing and excellent pass- 
work, the Wolves forged into the lead and were never 
again headed. Dantoni led the wa\' in shooting with six 
held goals. Broussard and W'inling also sho\Ned a keen 
eye for the basket. 

In the second game of the season, Loyola defeated the 
Ciymnastic Club in a \vhirhvind finish. In the last two 
minutes, the G. C. knotted the count at 22-22. This 
seemed to infuriate the Wolves, for on the next play-otf 
the\' opened up with a fierce attack that carried through 
the bewildered Gymnasts ior a goal, and a fe^v seconds 
later for a second goal, finishing with a four-point lead, 
26-22. Broussard was the outstanding star of the game. 
He repeatedly dribbled the ball down the floor to drop it 
in for a two-marker. \\'inling and nautoni also plaved 
well. 

Loyola next dropped a two-game series to Mississippi 
University. Height was the advantage that told the tale. Loyola's cagers are a small bunch, and 
they seemed diminutive alongside the tall Mississippians. In the first game Loyola could not find 
a suitable defense to stop the visitors. When our players spread out in a loose defense, the Ole 
Miss teain passed through them; when they formed a compact bunch at one end of the court, 
the visitors would shoot over their heads. The ability of the Mississippians to cage goals from 
any angle was discouraging. Winling was a great factor in bolstering up and steadying his 
team, and his individual plays helped to keep the score down to 26-15. Loyola began the 
second game with a rush that swept the Ole Miss team off their feet. Mississippi scored only one 
field goal in the first half. In the second half, Ole Miss began the beautiful passwork that had 
characterized their work on the preceding night. The score was tied and the teams remained 
in a 14.-14 deadlock until in the final minute of play Earl Johnson, the visitors' star, dropped in 
a foul goal that decided the game. The score was 15-14. Dantoni and Winling were our re- 
spective offensive and defensive stars. The former accounted for eight points. 

Southwestern Industrial Institute was the next victim of our whirlwind finish. Loyola 
clearly outplayed the \'isitors in the first half and ran up 12 points against their opponents' 4. In 
the second half Southwestern came back and tied the score; the remainder of the gaine was a 
nip and tuck affair, until the Wolves settled all doubts as to the final score \vith a garrison finish 
that carried them to a 31-28 ^'ictory. Broussard was in form in this game and scored goals from 
practically any angle. Winling and Hebert played great games at guard. 

In the next game we find Loyola playing L. S. U. in Baton Rouge. Loyola lost the first contest 
by a 27-20 score. The cause for this defeat must be attributed to Bob Jones, the Tiger for- 
ward, who practically single-handed defeated our team. Jones' shooting ability was uncanny. No 
angle seemed too difficult, no distance too long for the Tiger crack. The second game was a 
better contest, with our boys fighting every inch of the way. Loyola started off strong, and by the 
period had run up a 9-5 score. In the second our team weakened and this, coupled with several 
brilliant shots by Jones, lost the game for us by the score of 17-15. The whole team played 
well in the second encounter, but to Lastie Broussard must go the real honors of the combat. 
Jimmy \'orhoff broke into the regular line-up and turned in two creditable performances at guard. 
On returning from Baton Rouge, the Wolves engaged and defeated the Springhill College 
quintette in a two-game series. The outcome of the first game was uncertain until the final 



T 1 ' E W O L F, 19 2 4 



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LOYOLA UNIVERS 









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■whistle blew. 'J"lie play «as marked « ith hursts of sensational playing bv first one team and 
then the other. The Wolves jumped off to an early lead, which they held throughout the game, 
although they were threatened on several occasions by the Bogue-Brown combination. In the 
closing minutes of play Loyola stretched her lead to four points, which lead she held to the end. 
The final score was 27-23. The superiority of the Wolves was manifested on the second night, 
when they defeated the Hillians by the score of 29-17. The game was again featured bv a hair- 
raising last-minute spurt on the part of the Wolves. The visitors emerged on top at the end of 
the first half with a two-point lead, 14-12. In the second half, how Loyola outpassed, outshot 
and, in general, outplayed the Mobilians is manifest by the score. Winling led the way in scoring 
with six field goals and two foul goals. 

Loyola completed the Knights of Columbus series by winning a second game, 34-24. The 
Wolves met with little opposition in this game, which was played on the K. C. court, and caged 
goals at will. The Caseys were bewildered by the dazzling passwork of the Wolves, and our 
five-man defense seemed to puzzle them just as much. 

St. Stanislaus was the next team to appear in the Loyola gym, and they succeeded in defeat- 
ing us, 27-19. The Bay team got off to a good start and were never headed. Winling was the 
only Wolf who seemed able to play his usual steady game. "Rabbit" Hcbert, though onlv in the 
game for a short while, managed to cage two goals. 

Following the Stanislaus defeat, the team left for Mobile on their second and final road trip. 
The first game was played with the strong McCJowin-Lyons team, a combination composed mainly 
of old Springhill stars. This combination was no match for the fast and accurate passwork of 
the Loyolians. 

Following this victory, our team again defeated Springhill two games. As in the previous 
series, the first game was a close one, while our \\'olves were masters of the second contest. The 
'score of the first encounter was 21-15, ^ customary last-minute spurt enabling the Wolves to draw- 
away from their opponents. In this game Schweggman sprained his ankle, which injury kept him 
out practically the remainder of the season. Crane finished the game in his place. The Wolves 
had things well in hand in the second contest, drawing away to an 18-4 lead in the first half. 
In the second period they eased up, making use of all the substitutes. The Hillians took ad- 
vantage of this relax and began creeping up on the Wolves. Before any real damage could be 
done the regulars were again substituted and checked all further advances. The final score was 
26-18. 

On the following night, the team played St. Stanislaus in Bay St. Louis. Once again the Bay 
team took us over. The strain of games on successive nights told on our boys, and the re- 
sult was a reversal of the form that had featured our road play until this game. Thirty-one to 
fourteen was the count at the end of the game. 

The Wolves again came into their own on the following night, when they defeated the Cen- 
tenary Gentlemen in the most exciting game of the season. During the first half, the fast play of 
the Wolves swept the heavy players of the opposition off their feet. In the second half, our 
team tired and Centenary succeeding in tying the score at ii-ii. Centenary made the next score, 
giving them a two-point advantage. Three successful free shots for Loyola and one for Cen- 
tenary brought the score to 14 ail. In the last three minutes of play, Winling shot a brilliant 
goal from the center of the floor that placed the score at 16-14. Loyola got the ball on the next 
tap-oft and "froze" it under their own goal. 

The powerful Mississippi College aggregation were successful in two games following the 
Centenary victory. In the first contest the visitors, led by Cy Parks, triumphed over the Wolves 

by a score. In the second game, the Wolves started off in cyclonic fashion and succeeded 

in running up an 11 -2 lead at the end of the first half. The Choctaws were completely be- 
wildered by the speed and the passwork of the Wolves. Loyola weakened in the second half, 
and Mississippi gradually forged ahead and ended the game victorious. The score was 30-23. 
Winling, backed up by \'orhoff and Crane, were big factors in Loyola's excellent showing. 

The \A^olves closed the season with a two-game series with L. S. U. in the Lo>ola gym. 
Jones, the Tiger forward, was again the reason for Loyola's defeat. It seemed as if it were im- 
possible for the lank Tiger to miss a throw within the center of the court. Winling was his big 
rival for the honors of the night. Winling matched every goal that Jones put in with one of 
his own. The usual support from the rest of the Loyola five was lacking, and the result was a 
21-14 defeat. Loyola brought a very successful season to a very inglorious close when she 
went down to ignoble defeat before the L. S. U. Tigers in the final game of the season. Only 
four points were scored by the Wolves; Harold Winling accounted for half of that number with a 
field goal. The other two points were the result of free throws by Price Crane. The team was 
entirely oflF color. 



Hill 



. F, 19 2 4 



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3 



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THF V;'OLF. 192 4 



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llll 



138 



v; ' O L F. I ■■! 



Tke Diamond Year 




A record of thirteen victories and seven defeats against 
some of the leading college teams of this section stamjied 
Coach Bruce Hayes' baseball team as one of tlie repre- 
seiitati\e dianiimd squads of the Southwest. Making 
their debut in "big time" baseball, the Loyola Wolves 
of 1924 added another brilliant chapter to the most 
eventful and successful season in the comparati\el\ brief 
athletic histor> of the Uni\ersity. 

Of those thirteen victories, six were o\er Louisiana 
opponents, which, «"hen jutted agauist two one-run de- 
feats by the same Pelican state clubs, clearly establish the 
Wolves as the foremost contender for the 1924 Lomsiana 
championship. 

Lhider the guidance of Hruce Hayes, one of the ablest 
baseball mentors in the South and a diamond star of 
more than passing note in his da\, Loyola got oft to a 
bright start and kept up a pace through a rather strenuous schedule which called for 
a road trip of ten games in succe.ssion. Their success <luring this campaign has offered 
rosv prospects for future seasons, as it pro\ed the right of the Wohes to recognition 
from the leading college teams of the South, and next year's schedule is exjiected to 
show the fruit of their accomplishments. 

Alread\ games are being arranged with Illinois and Louisiana State. The latter 
sciies, iollowing the annual contests with Centenary and Louisiana Polytech, will iin- 
doiibtedh go a long \va\s towards establishing a real ch.inipionship nine among the 
college teams of the state, as \ictories in all three series should give the Wohes a clear 
claim to the t'tle. 

l;ut to get back to the 1924 season. Coach Hayes was fortunate in being able to 
work with some of the finest diamond talent in the Southern collegiate field. As a 
backbone for his squad he had Jimmy Vorhoff, a sterling little infielder, who spent his 
vacation on the bench of the Cleveland Indians, where Tris Speaker is priming him 
for the days after he leaves Loyola; Jimmie Babington, without a doubt the foremost 
college catcher in this section; Bob Dunbar and Leiinie Toups, two able hurlers, and 
a collection of others who did their share towards the success of the season. 

With this talent on hand, he rapidly molded it into a fast baseball club and, al- 
though one or two weak spots showed up during the strain of the season. Coach Hayes 
will have his 1924 line-up practically intact next season, and with the additional 
year of experience the\- should show great improvement. Loyola gained the name of 



T H '-• 



\xr nip \ Q 1 A 



y?^ 



LOVO! A UN 






li'l'L-. - - ,i 





] 'M: 


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fence-busters on its tour through Ala- 
bama, Mississippi and Louisiana when 
scarceh' a game went by without one or 
more home runs being knocked, Jimmy 
Babington, Harold Winling and Liiigi 
D'Antoni all getting their share. 

Bob Dunbar opened the season for 
the ^Volves at Heinemann Park against 
the New Orleans Pelicans, 1923 cham- 
pions of the Southern League. Bob 
held the professionals to five hits, while 
his teammates were hitting Gene Cal- 
dera, star left-hander from the Texas 
League, and who was pitching depend- 
able ball for the Pelicans, for ten safe- 
ties. Superior base running and field- 
ing enabled the Southern leaguers to 
win a 4-2 decision over the Wolves. 

The hitting of Jimmie Vorhof? was a 
feature, one of his blows sailing into 
centerfield for three bases. 

Dunbar's work was very impressive 
In this opening game, and many weeks afterwards the writer met Manager Gilbert of 
the New Orleans Club in Atlanta, and one of his first remarks was, "Who is that big 
fellow you sent against us? I'd like to have him try out with my club." But Bob 
liiis other ambitions, and when he gets through pitching them over the plate at Loyola 
he 11 start slinging words across the bar in the Louisiana courts. 

Lennie Toups, the "old reliable" from Springhill, was a bit slow in rounding to 
form, while Hughie Rogers, the other member of the hurling corps, was suffering 
from an injured back, so it fell to Dunbar to shoulder the major portion of the pitch- 
ing burden during the first couple of weeks. However, Toups soon regained his old- 
time zip and towards the close of the season he was pitching great ball. 

The opening game of the collegiate season was one of the prettiest pitching duels 
seen during the year. Bob Dunbar took the mound against Eddie McEvoy, ace of 
the Springhill hurling staff. Both pitchers must be credited with fine performances, 
each allowing only three hits, but Loyola bunched its trio and scored a 2-1 victory. 

Springhill came back with a vengeance the next day and hammered Rogers and 
Toups for a 11-9 victory, evening the series. Loyola hit Grill, of the Hillians, hard, 
but the wildness of the Wolves' hurlers, coupled with hard hitting by the visitors, over- 
came the lead. 




924 



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Dunbar contributed another sterling effort against St. Stanislaus on the home 
grounds and shut the Bay team out, 3-0. Bontemps, of the Saints, was given great 
support to hold the Wolves down. The second game of the St. Stanislaus series 
was a free hitting battle, with the Wolves gaining a 12-9 verdict. Rogers and Toups 
opposed Haydel on the mound. 

Two games with ^lississippi College, one of the strongest clubs in the SoLith- 
west, closed the home stand of Bruce Hayes' team. Dunbar was ha\ing much the 
best of Clarke, star left-hander of the Choctaws, who, incidentalh', has been signed 
by the Cleveland Indians. Loyola got off to a 3-0 lead, when suddenly two untimely 
errors put the visitors in a position to tie the score and they came through with the 
necessary punch. The game went into the tenth inning, when a rally gave the Choc- 
ta-.vs two runs and a 5-3 victory. It was a tough game for Bob to lose. 

However, Toups buoyed up the spirits of Loyola supporters by returning to form 
in the second game and handing the team from Clinton a 4-1 defeat. 

Then, with four victories and two defeats on its slate, Loyola started on a rather 
trying road trip of ten games The record shows an even break, one win and a loss 
at St. Stanislaus, giving them the series with the Saints, three games to one ; an even 
split at Springhill and Mississippi College. Up at Shreveport, the Wolves struck a 
snag in the Centenary "Gentlemen," who captured both games, but they made up for 
these losses by sweeping the Louisiana Polytech team in two contests. 

Nine to si.x stood the win and loss column upon their return to the hom; grounds, 
and they earned the highest congratulations for their good showing on the road. 

Louisiana Polytech came down from Alexandria for two games and went back with 
a pair of losses, Loyola making a clean sweep of the four-game series. Dunbar won a 
4-2 pitcher's battle from Files, while Toups pitched himself on the long end of a ig-3 
score in the other game. 



v;' O L F. 19 2 4 



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LOYOLA UNIVERS 



v^'- ' 1 







Then came two of the most bitterly contested games of the season, bringing the 
baseball year to a fitting close. Without the loss of a series all season, the Wolves faced 
the task of winning both games from the hard-hitting "Gentlemen" in order to redeem 
the two losses at Shreveport and to keep their slate clean. 

Toups faced Long in the first game, which was hard fought from start to finish, 
but Loyola came through with a 4-3 triumph and Dunbar was elected to hurl the 
final. The Wolves hopped onto Davis with a vengeance and gave Dunbar a big lead, 
which he turned into a victory, 11-5. 

As the ciutain was run down on a fine season, we look forward to a much better one 
in 1925, and we close with the password, "Watch the Wolves." 



1 ',-' If' 



143 



92 4 






LO^'OL 



Baseball Sckedule 



Loyola 2 

Loyola 9 

Loyola 3 

Loyola 12 

Loyola 3 

Loyola 4 

Loyola II 

Loyola 9 

Loyola 10 

Loyola 5 

Loyola i 

Loyola 7 

Loyola 2 

Loyola 1 

Loyola 7 

Loyola 9 

Loyola 19 

Loyola 4 

Loyola 4 

Loyola II 



Springhill I 

Springhill ii 

St. Stanislaus O 

St. Stanislaus 9 

Mississippi College 5 

Mississippi College I 

St. Stanislaus 9 

St. Stanislaus 11 

Springhill 5 

Springhill 10 

Mississippi College 11 

^Mississippi College 4 

Centenary 3 

Centenary 4 

Louisiana 3 

Louisiana Polytech 5 

Louisiana Polytech 3 

Louisiana Polytech 2 

Centenary 3 

Centenary 5 



THE WOLF, 1924 



>T> 



LOYOL. 




^ 



r-^^J. 



192 4 






LOYOLA UI^!IVERS^ 




Godchaux Cup 



During the past year a magnificent loving cup was donated by the Leon Godchaux 
Clothing Company to the Loyola student who excelled in football, basketball and 
baseball. The donors of the cup announced that a similar one would be given each 
year, with the hope that it might be an incentive for students to excel in athletics and 
to promote more enthusiasm in the activities of the university. 

Harold Winling, who brought victory to Loyola in many of the football, basketball 
and baseball contests of the past year, and who became the outstanding star of many 
of the games that he engaged in, received the cup this year. The selection was made 
by the Loyola Athletic Association, and it has met with great satisfaction, both among 
students and among the football populace of the South The stiff arm, the sidestep 
and the speed of Harold Winling are well known to those who have seen him play 
football. In basketball his excellent pass work and caging have caused him to be pro- 
nounced a finished player. His fielding and hitting on the diamond have won for him 
his laurels as a baseball star. 



^AS 



n 1 . F 19 2 4 



y^D 








To promote a greater interest in the international 
game of tennis at the University, a club was formed 
during the latter part of the school year. Although 
only in its infancy, it has a fairly large number of stu- 
dents among its membership. To accomplish its pur- 
pose, the Loyola Tennis Club intends to conduct a 
series of elimination contests to select the participants in 
a final tournament. This tournament will be com- 
posed of both single and double contests. To the win- 
ners of both will be awarded trophies. 

The officers of the club are: President Francis 
Kanimer and Secretary G. Price Crane. Among its 
membership are the following students: 

Bernard A. Dempsey 
Harold A. Dempsey 
P. A. Gaudet 
J. R. Glass 
John Holmes 
Harry Kiksella 
Gardere Moore 
Hexry O'Connor 
Emile Rive 
Raymond Stulb 



146 




y Jf ERE Jiou Dji'/I find the men and T»om- 
i M men ivhose activities and spirit of co- 
operation have created the atmos- 
phere of college life while giving to the stern- 
ijllll' er studies the romance and poetry of social 
service and human art. 







.^Lx^st-7 — ^r^rr^ 


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liiilil'iiiiiislltiis:"! 



CHAPTER FOUR 

ORGANIZATIONS 

l|ili|Wlli|ll!P[l[|!l!l|!ni|!l|i|l||||i!i!ll|[[!WII[|l[(i^yii|[ni|iiill|}|'g||ili[i!|i'lil[!ft^ 



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L, o ^' o L A 




ISO 



T F 4 ./^) 



Tke Beggars 

Founded at Loyola University, 1923 



Colors: Gold and Purple Floii'rr: Carnation 

Officers 

Gardere Moore President 

Harold A. Dempsey J'iic-PrcsiJent 

G. Price Crane Secretary 

Henry O'Connor Treasurer 

Fratres in Urbe 

G. Price Crane P. Archibald Gaudet 

Harold A. Dempsey Jerry Glas 

Francis Kammer 

Harry Kinsella 

Gardere Moore 

Henry F. O'Connor 

Emile Rive 

Pledges in Urbe 

Bernard A. Dempsey 
James O'Connor, Jr. 

Pledges in Universitate 

L. D. Dunbar, Baton Rouge, La. 
Lester Hebert, New Roads, La. 



iSi 



H E W O I. F. 1 9 2 



y?) 



LOYOLA U: 




isa 



/J) LOYOLA UNIVLK^)! 



Psi Omega 



Founded at Baltimore Collese nf Dental Surgery, 1892 
Active Chapters, 46. Alumni Chapters, 123. 



Delta Omega Chapter 



Officers 

B. C. White Grand Maslrr 

W. M. NiCAUD liinior Muslir 

P. J. ToMENY Si'iii-lary 

I. G. Gross Treasurer 

V. Ledbetter Inguisitor 

J. A. COMEAUX Editor of the Fratar 

^Iemeers 

E. J. Armand D. R. Isom 

J. A. Comeaux E. Jacobs 

A. Ferxandez V. Ledbetter 

I. G. Gross L. Lew, Jr. 

J. D. Mateu 

L. Maumus " . 

W. M. Nicaud 

J. A. Richard 

J. Steckler 

P. Tome NY 

P. TUNSTALL 

B. White 



T H E W O L F, ! 9 2 4 



y?s 



LOYOLA UNIV 




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154 



T ' 1 924 



Alpka Pki Delta 

A Legal Fraternity 
Established at L(i\ola Iniversity, 1924. 

Officers 

MoiSF. Thibodeaux President 

DuFOUR Bavle Vice-President 

Lloyd Adams Secretary 

Raol'L Sere, Jr Treasurer 

A. S. BoiSFONTAiN'E Historian 

]\lEi\IBERS 

Lovn Adams 
DuFOUR Bavle 

E. EOAGNI 

A. S. BOISFONTAINE 

G. G. Brown 

N. M. Chambers 

A. Curtis 

W. J. CURREN 

J. Davries 

V. Gros 

Ernest Jeammard 

B. Lancaster 

W. MOUTON 

S. E. Owen 
Raoul Sere 
D. O. Smith 
1 J- A. Smith, Jr. 

M. Thibodeaux 

T. TOMENV 

J. Unsworth 



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rHii WOLF. 1924 J-i) LOYOLA- U N I V L RS IT Y 



dik 













Beta 


Pki Sigma 
















A Ph 


armary Fraternity 






Co. 


lors: 


White 


and 


BIi 


le 

Lam 


bda Chapter 


Founded 


1888 



Officers 

Dr. J. Crasser I't-ncrahlf Sage 

L. A. Landry Esteemed Sage 

R. S. Whitley Nohlc Senior 

C. E. Walcott Il'orthy Junior 



D. M. Baker . . 




. Counscllof 




E. A. Smith . . 




. Conductor 


N. P. DUG.AS . . 




. . Exchequer 


p. J. Theriot . . 




. Sienographcr 


T. B. Price . . . 




. . Marshal 




A. E. Cangelosi . 




. Librarian 




H. Sandoz . . . 




. Sentinel 






Members 








Mike J. Artall 








D. M. Baker 








J. Billeaud, Jr. 








H. E. Cangelosi 








W. Coop 








N. P. DUGAS 








C. Fabacher 








C. FORNEA 








L. A. Landry 








J. J. Napoli 








T. B. Price 








H. L. Sandoz 








L. B. SCHWEGMANN 








E. A. Smith 








P. J. Theriot 








C. E. WALcorr 








R. S. Whitley 








D. J. Crasser 








1S7 







THE W O L F 1 Q ? 4 



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LOYOLA UNlVLllbLi ', 




Sigma Alpha Kappa 

Established at Loyola University, 1924 Colors: Black and Gold 



Officers 

Harold Win'LINC President A. D. Smith . . . . 

E. A. Smith I'iee-I'resident J. R. Domkngeaux . 



. Secretary 
. Treasurer 



Honorary Members 
B. S. D'Antom \Vm. K. Flvnn 



Members 

Louis D'Antoni J. R. Domengeaux C. Gibson 

Gordon Hebert A. D. Smith E. A. Smith 

Harold Winling Leo Schwecmann 



T H E V;/ O L F, ! 9 2 



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LOYOLA UNIVERS: 











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Epsilon Kappa Sigma 



The Columbians 



Beta Chapter 

Officers - : . 

A. A. SoNGY Grand Crusader i 

Joseph Moxie /■;<(■ Grand Crusader 

■■■":■': 
A. Broussaro Si-creiary 

Joseph Cermgi.ia Treasurer 

IMembers ■ .-.:.' ' 

E. J. ArMAND KiRlLEV BOUDREAUX ' -. M 

J. BiLLEAUD, Jr. Sidney Eoudreaux i ■ 

Andrew Brol'SSArd A. J. Comeaux, Jr. : f ' :; ■ 

Marcus Broussard J. W. Emmer ! 

Maurice Fourcade ' i.-V- ■•" '}'' 

H. C. Grace ' j;; 'y-;;, ;_'^ 

Wm. Hebert I !■■;!■■■ I' 

A. S. Johnstone ''I': ■■ ■'''' 

H. G. KOHNKE 1. 

A. b. Koorie I ■'.■'',':■■•;' ' ':' 

Buddy Lemoine ■ m '■■■■'iil 

J. F. MoNiE \\.'_ :;:■?,': i I 

Joseph Nolan ; ■■•.:'' ijl 



F. Ferret 

A. A. SONGV 



i6i 



THE WOLF. 1924 



LOYOLA UNI\ 




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I-! '- W O \ Jr\ 19 2 4 



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164 



Air 



V\/ O L F\ 19 2 4 



Student Council 

Composed of Students of the Day School of the University 

Reverend Francis L. Janssen, S. J. 
Faculty .Idvisor 



Officers 



W. Strickland . . 
A. A. SoxGv 



. . Chairman 
Secretary 



Delegates 

Alts and Science 

Philip Clark 
G. Price Crane 

A. A. SONGY 



Dented 

W. NiCAUD 

W. Strickland 

P. TOMENY 

Phat-iiiacy 

N. Dugas 
H. L. Sandoz 
P. J. Theriot 



165 



T H \:\ W O L F. 19 2 4 



y^ 



Lo^'OLA ur 




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/aA\^ Honor Council 



Senior (Uiiss 

II. W. CllRISIENCERRV 
A. H. CiUILBEAU 

J. A. Meun'ier 

S. G. WiMBERLV 

A. T. Zammit 
Junior Class 

A. S. BOISFONTAINE 

V. J. Gros 

J. SCIIAAF 

I.. A. Schwartz 

Freshman Class 

J. E. Dlglas 
A. A. Lew 

J. G. VlOSCA 

Prc-Legal Class 
R. J. St. Paul 



if,7 



;:■ O L F. 19 2 4 



/^ 



LOYOLA UniV 










i6S 






I y 1 4 



College Organization 

REVtKEND Francis I,. Janssen", S. J. 
Fill ally Advisor 

Officers 

A. A. SONGV Prisidcnt 

Paul A. Gaudet I'ia-Prrsidint 

P. H. Clark Secretary 

Ivo Peterman' Treasurer 

Executive Committee 

Paul Bailev 
Andrew Broussard 
Philip Clark 
Joseph Dardis 
HARni.D A. Dempsev 
Paul A. CIaudet 
Ivo Petermax 
George Schoenberger 
A. A. SoxGv 



tfi9 



THE WOLF, 1924 



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LOYOLA UNIVERE 



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Dental Organization 

Rf.vkrkm) F. D. Slii.ivan, S. J. 
Faeully .Id-visnr 

Officers 

SiRiCKi.ANii Prrsidcnl 

D. R. IsoM rur-Presidnit 

K. White Secrrlary 

P. J. ToMEKV Treasurer 




1: 



■^-S '■-■■ "■>■ i-^^i^ ' 



. F. 19 2 4 



J',} 



LOYOLA UNlVERSrrY 




Pharmacy Organization 

Dr. J. J. Grasser, Vaiidly Adi-isor 
Officers 

R. S. Whitley President 

L. B. ScHWEGMAw I'iee-President 

P. J. Theriot Seerelary 

E. A. Smith Treasurer 



.; txLvSYi; 



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j; r-; i: \x/'o l, f. i '^i 2 4 



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.OYOI.A U 



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92 4 



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Sodality of tke Blessed Virgin Mary 

CoUfijc Section 
REVF.Rrxi) JnsRPH Walsh, S. J Moderator 

Officers 

Joseph Darius I'rifnl 

G. SciinENBERCER Issislaiit I'rrfeil 

G. Berxari) lisislnnl I'rrfiil 

W. J. IJAKKI-R Secrtlary-Tri usurer 

Charles Novel Saeris/ait 

Aqniiuis Seetion 
Officers 

J. Dardis (UiairtiKiii 

Andrew Brolssaru Secretary-Treasurer 

IMe.mhf.rs 

G. J. Azar Bernard Dempsev F. P. Kammer 

W. J. Barker J. M. Flouriet Harry Kinsella 

Frank M. Billiu Frank Flynn J. P. Markey 

W. A. Bourgeois P. A. Gaudet Charles Novel 

A. Broussard Herman Gaudet H. F. O'Connor 

L. J. Broussard Clifford Gendrox Emile Rive 

G. J. Capdeville R. J. Gi.AS A. A. Songv 

P. E. Ci.outhier H. p. C;ri(:gs G. C. Schoenrerger 

Price Crane W. J. Hebert A. D. Smith 

J. DardIS Jas. J. WOULFE 

Truth Section 
Officers 

C^uv Bernard (Uiairnian 

G. Schoenberger \ei relary-Treasurer 

Members 

G. Bernard A. A. Songy P. S. Clark 

A. Brue G. C. Schoenberger J. M. Flouriet 

J. P. Macaluso Harold A. Dempsey Edwin Vega 

ir elf arc Section 
Officers 

\V. J. Barker Cliainnan 

M. J. Hartson Secretary-Treasurer 

Members 
W. J. Barker W. C. Hanneman Albert Yfnni 

A. E. Hanneman M. J. Hartson Malchom Yenni 

'73 



\:i^'' 



THE WOLF. 192 4 



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LOYOLA 



f 







192 4 .'-^ LOYOLA UhOVK 



> 




Sodality of tke Blessed Virgin 


Mary 


Laiv Department 




Officers 




Reverend Joseph Walsh, S. J 


j^lodereitor 


George D. Smart 


■ . . . Prefect 


R. St. Paul 


Secretary 


Class Representatives 




Leslie Gardner Jeff Clktis 




Senior Junior 




Arthur M. Curtis 




Junior 




Stephen C. Hartel 




Freshman 




Makv a. Van Geffen 




Prc-Legal 




Peter F. Jones 




Prc-Legal 




175 





. O L F, 19 2 4 



/^ 



LOYQLA UNIVERSIT 




176 



102 4 y^' \.0\0[_,', 



Sodality oi tne Blessed Virgin Mary 

Dental Department 
Officers 

Reverend Joseph Walsh, S. J Moderator 

Wallace Xicaud Prefect 

J. A. CoMEAux Secretary 

Delegates 

Joseph Nolan- 
Joseph Tamburello 
J. C. McMahon' 



:|||| 



177 



THE WOLF, 1924 



yr> 



LOYOLA UNIVERSr 




17S 



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LO^'OLA UNIVLRlilT 



College Debating Society 

Officers 

Joseph Dardis Pn-siJenl 

G. Price Crane I'itr-Prcsidinl 

G. SCHOENBERCER Scaelary and Tiiiisurer 

Members 

Wm. J. Barker 
G. Price Crane 
Joseph Dardis 
Harold A. Dempsev 
Paul A. Gaudet 
Jerry Glas 
Maurice Hartson 
Fran'cis Kammer 
Harry Kinsella 
Gardere Moore 
Henry O'Connor 
Emile Rive 
George Schoenbercer 
aubin a. songy 



'■il:'.:^^) 



179 



■M\ 



T H r-\ ■ W O L F^ I Q 7 4 



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Law Debating Society 

Officers 

Leo R. Wertheimer PrrsiJnil 

E. P. Deutsch riir-PirsiJi/it 

Stephen C. Hartel Snrrlary and Tii-asurer 



RIemrers 
E. M. BoAGNi, Jr. 

A. S. BOISFONT.MN'E 

E. p. Peltsch 

\V. J. C5ALLAGIIEK 

G. W. Gill 

J. P. CklLLOT 

Stephen- C. Hartel 

Ernest Jeanmard 

Marx Jeffer 

A. M. LeMoine 

A. A. Lew 

C. M. Mathern 

H. L. MiDLO 

A. H. Reed 

R. B. Reed 

J. Rubenstein' 

Louis Schwartz 

N. R. TlLDEN 
J. G. VlSOCA 

Leo B. Wertheimer 



J ]_i |7 \x/ o I _ F ! Q ? 4 



y^ 



LOYOKA UNTVF.RSIT 







/^ LOYOLA \J]\\' 



College Literary Society 

Officers 

IlAkny.D A. Dempsi-v I'n-sidrnt 

G. Pricr Crane I'ia-Pri-sidcnt 

Henry O'Connor Scrniiiry 

Jerry Glas Ti easurvr 

Members 

Gallier Capdeviklle 
G. Price Crane 
Bernard A. Dempsey 
Harold A. Dempsey 
Milton Fleuriet 
Paul A. Gaudet 
Philip Giuffre 
Jerry' Glas 
Francis Kammer '; 
Harry Klvsella 
Gardere Moore 
Lee Novo 
Henry O'Connor 
Emile Rive 
Edwin \'eca 



V;:-;v:|! 



T H !"-' ^'^^ O L F. 19 2 4 



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L' 




I $4 



LO^'-OI. A 



Loyola Glee Club 



Directors 

Rev'erkm) Jam[:s Courtney, S. J. 
Professor Victor Ciiesnais 

IMembers 

Joiix Calogne 
Philip Ci.ark 
Wm. F. Coop 
John Dullentv 
T. H. Earhart 
Nathax Gaston- 
Joseph Greenberg 
A. Haxnevian 
Fi.EMiN IIani.ev 
W'm. IIeiiert 
V. A. Lamonte 
Victor Ledbetter 
A. M. Lemoine 
T. C. McVea 

J. A. RUBENSTEIN' 

E. A. Smith 

A. A. SONGV 

RussEL St. Pal'l 



i8S 



T H E W O L F. 1 9 2 4 



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LOYOLA UNIVERSIT 



^^^•;;,^.';;j^v!^''^;{fi!.;i^<!f]f(!i!5.'iK;;5;;^^^ 




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WOLF, 1924 yj) LOYOL.\ UMlVLKSfi'^ 



Loyola Orcnestra 

Rkv. Fr. Francis, Direttor 

Members 

A. Cangai.osi J'iiilin 

E. Merilh riotin 

J. TuMiNEi.LO Bass 

G. Bernard Piano 

R. Stui.b Saxoplionr 

J. A. Richard Cornet 

V. B. Stassi Drums 

F. Kammer Drums 

H. B. Harris Cornel 

J. Steckler I'iolin 

L. Brolssard Cornel 

E. M. BoAGNi, Jr I'iolin 

L. Lew Cornel 

F. M. BiLLiu Violin 

C. Gendron Saxophone 

L. Lemoine I'iolin 

K. BouDREAU I'iolin 

G. AzAR Trombone 

F. Ferret Clarinet 



m 



187 



T H E W O L F. 19 2 4 



LOYOLA 



m-::r-AH 




^ 



Ladies Marquette Auxiliary Association 



Mrs. 


S. P. ACHEE 


Miss 


Mrs. 


M. Z. Adams 


Mrs. 


Miss 


S. E. Alker 


Mrs. 


Miss Cammie Allen- 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


F. 0. Allen 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


B. Artigue 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


B. Autrev 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


B. AVENGO 


Mrs. 


Miss 


Sarah Babb 


Mrs. 


Miss 


Ida Baccich 


Miss 


Mrs. 


A. J. Badger 


Miss 


Miss 


D. Baecklev 


Miss 


Mrs. 


G. B. Baldwin 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


J. P. Baldwin 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


D. F. Ballina 


Miss 


Mrs. 


J. B. Bannon 


Mrs. 


Mrs. 


Frank Barker 


Miss 


Miss 


Ellen P. Barrett 


Mrs. 


Miss 


Marguerite Bavon 


Miss 


Mrs. 


A. Bendernagel 


Mrs. 


Miss 


Heloise Billon 


Miss 


Mrs. 


G. A. Blaffer 


Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 



Alice Blahut 
R. E. Blanchard 
Luc IAN Bland 
John Blank 
W. G. Blasdel 
Charles Bloom 
J. D. Bloom 
Jos. Blum 
Alfred Bonomo 
Lucille Bostick 
May Bostick 
Thelma Bougere 
P. L. Bouny 
Louise Boyer 
Ella Brandt 
M. E. Breen 
Cammie Brennan 
O. J. Brennan 
A. Broussard 
C. W. Brown 
Julia Buckley 
Ernest Burguierres 
Ida p. Burns 
M. W. Buya 
S. M. Byrne 
J. R. Cabrera 
Amelia Cade 
H. C. Cage 
Thos. Caldwell 
John Callan 
Mary Carey 
E. Carrere 
Louise Carrere 

C. C. Caspard 
H. J. Cassidy 

D. A. Chaffraix 
Cora E. Chalin 
Albert Chalona 
Jos. Chalona 

L. M. Chastatnt 
Marie L. Chevalier 
B. Chipley 
R. M. Chisholm 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 



C. L. Clapp 
John F. Clark 
Edward Claudel 
A. J. Claverie 

A. V. Coco 
M. Cody 

T. W. Coffer 
W. Clements 
Mary Cloney 
Jas. Collins 
Mamie Collins 
C. M. Comes 

B. B. Connor 

C. C. COWLES 

Ada Crozier 
d. p. curren 
E. B. Curtis 
L. M. Dalgarn 
Dalsimer 

Henrieita Damiens 
S. D'Antoni 
A. M. Dardis 



189 



T hi E WOLF. 192 



yr> 



LOYOLA UNIVF,R5' 



ij 


11.--: 


!! Miss 




: ' Mrs. 




';; Mrs. 




Miss 


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'l Miss 
Mrs. 




Miss 




Miss 




Mrs. 


S- ■' - 


j Miss 


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Mrs. 
j Mrs. 






i Mrs. 


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Mrs. 


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Mrs. 




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N. C. D.^RDIS 

W. J. Dardis 
J. J. D'Aqlun 
Anna Davey 
L. Oavries 
Ratiibon'e UeBl\s 
LiSE [IE Gruv 
Jan'ette Delanev 

E. F. DelBoxdio 
L. Dei.Bondio 
Alfons DelMarmoi. 
Geo. j. Dempsev 
John Dempsev 
George Denegre 

e. p. cun'diff 
V. D[:sFOOGES 
M. E. Devlin 
DoROTHV Diamond 
Sam Diamond 
John Dibert 

T. J. DiMITRV 

Laura Discon 
Mercedes Discon 

LORETTA DOERR 

i. h. don'nell 
e. j. donohue 
Allen Douglas 
John Douglass 

F. Dowlinc 
Mary E. Drown 
Ethel Duffv 

j. c. dupont 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 



J. W. Durel 
J. J. A. Edwards 

L. Z. EiNHORN 

Irene Emerson 
Robert Ewing 
Albert Estorge 
Lawrence Fabacher 
Peter Fabacher 
David Fahey 
J. W. Fairfax 
Thos. Farrell 
Naida Fassman 
Virginia Fassman 
Mabel Fatjo 
T. Ferguson 
Chas. Fernandez 
Rose Ferran 
Edward Fielding 
Ruby Fields 

M. E. FiNERTY 

Margaret Finney 
MoLLEY Finney 
J. Fisher 
Elenor Fitch 
T. J. Flanagan 

K. M. FlL KER 

A. S. Foley 
Edward Ford 
C. B. Fo.Y 
Jack Francis 
Louis Frey 
E. D. Friedrichs 
HiCKEV Friedrichs 
A. M. Fromherz 
C. J. Gambel 
A. R. c;ately 
Jos. A. Gauche 
Margaret Gee 
Will J. Gibbens 
George S. Gibbons 
Sam Gillmore 
May Glynn 
May Glynn 
John Grace 
Virginia Grace 
E. Graham 
M. Graham 
E. Greenard 
J. E. Grefer 



Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 



E.M.MA Grima 
Em.ma Guenard 
Alice Guerin 
R. K. Hale 
J. H. Hammett 
M. Hardel 

E. Hartwell 

S. C. Hartwell 
Anna Hassinger 
L. Hassinger 
Jeanne Hatrel 
Jos. Hebert 
T. J. Henderson 
Jos. P. Henn'ican 
P. A. Hickey 
H. T. Higcinbotham 

W. M. HOBBS 

Walter Hoffman 
J. M. Hubert 
W. O. Humphreys 
Miles Hutson 
Catherine Hurley 
Frank F. Hyatt 
Stonewall Jackson 
John F. Jane 

H. L. JANIN 

L. W. O. Janssen 
Irma Jaubert 

F. L. Jaubert 

M. Yvonne Jauberi 
Rita Johnson 
Larz a. Jones 



y'^ 



LOYOLA UNLVL 







Miss 








Mrs. 


Geo. Jurcens 


A. McCaffery 


Miss 


Jennie Morgam 


Mrs. 


Chas. p. Kelleher 


Miss 


F. McCarty 


Miss 


Etta Morlier 


Mrs. 


R. Kelleher 


Mrs. 


H. B. McCloskey 


Miss 


Ellen L. Murphy 


Miss 


Catherine Kelly 


Mrs. 


Jos. McCloskey 


Miss 


Susie Murphy 


Miss 


E. Kelly 


Mrs. 


John McCloskey 


Miss 


Heloise Navarre 


Miss 


Anna F. Kennedy 


Miss 


Mary McCloskey 


Mrs. 


A. C. Nelson 


Mrs. 


Wm. a. Kern'aghax 


Mrs. 


A. M. McDonald 


Miss 


L. Nicholls 


Miss 


C. KiLLEEN 


Miss 


V. McGuiGAN 


Mrs. 


T. C. Nicholls 


Mrs. 


M. C. Killeen 


Mrs. 


E. B. McKlNNEY 


Mrs. 


J. D. Nix 


Mrs. 


F. J. Kimberger 


Miss 


Olive MacKnight 


Mrs. 


J. J. Nix 


Mrs. 


John E. Koerner 


Mrs. 


R. A. McLaughlin 


Mrs. 


Wm. T. Nolan 


Mrs. 


H. E. Kuhner 


Miss 


E. McLaughlin 


Mrs. 


Ernest Norman 


Miss 


Haydee Laiche 


Miss 


M. McLaughlin 


Miss 


M. Norris 


Miss 


Kate Lancaster 


Miss 


Mary McManici.e 


Mrs. 


N. J. Nutter 


Mrs. 


J. Hamilton Landry 


Miss 


M. MURRY 


Miss 


Ethel O'Day 


Mrs. 


Albert J. Laplace 


Miss 


C. McNally 


Miss 


L. M. Ogden 


Mrs. 


M. Larkin 


Mrs. 


M. C. McNamara 


Mrs. 


C. W. O'Leary 


Mrs. 


G. Larroussini 


Mrs. 


Oswald McNeese 


Mrs. 


J. P. O'Leary 


Mrs. 


Emile Larroux 


Miss 


Anna McNeill 


Mrs. 


C. C. Olney 


Miss 


Ruth Lawler 


Miss 


N. E. McNeill 


Miss 


V. O'Reilly 


Miss M. LeBeau 


Mrs. 


Arthur McQuirk 


Mrs. 


J. P. Palmer 


Miss 


Amelia LeBlanc 


Mrs. 


A. J. McShane 


Mrs. 


A. T. Pattison 


Miss 


M. LeBolirgeois 


Miss 


Ruth McShane 


Mrs. 


Geo. p. Penrose 


Miss 


A. A. Leckert 


Mrs. 


M. Macheca 


Mrs. 


Emil Perrin 


Miss V. Leclerc 


Mrs. 


W. D. McGiNxiss 


Miss Ruby" V. Perry" 


Miss 


A. LeSassier 


Mrs. 


J. F. Maher 


Mrs. 


H. Peters 


Mrs. 


R. LeSassier 


Mrs. 


H. J. Malochee 


Mrs. 


Geo. Peyreflite 


Mrs. 


Alex LeDou.x 


Mrs. 


J. E. Manning 


Mrs. 


R. R. Phelps 


Mrs. 


S. Livaudais 


Mrs. 


W. Manion 


Mrs. 


R. L. PiLSBURY 


Miss F. Loeber 


Mrs. 


R. S. Manley 


Miss 


Esperance Prat 


Mrs. 


R. C. Lynch 


Mrs. 


B. F. Markey 


Mrs. 


Albin Provosty 


Mrs. 


P. H. McArdle 


Mrs. 


John F. Markey 


Miss V. Provosty 






Miss 


Leita Martin 










Miss Reine R. Martin 










Miss 


C. Martinez 










Miss 


C. Mathis 










Mrs. 


J. C. Maurer 










Mrs. 


S. Maunsell 










Mrs. 


C. L. Mayor 










Mrs. 


H. Grady Meadow 










Mrs. 


W. Mehle 










Mrs. 


Bernard Meyer 










Miss 


Paula Merilh 










Mrs. 


W. H. Meyer 










Mrs. 


Fred Miranda 










Mrs. 


Frank Moise 










Mrs. 


J. R. MONTGUILLOT 










Miss Jessie C. Montejo 










Mrs. 


J. E. MORAGES 

191 







\h- 



i i;-' !t 



li 




1 






, 



Mrs. 


E. N. PUGH 


Miss 


L. SCHLOSSER 


Mrs. 


Oscar Trolicht 


Miss 


Angele Puig 


Mrs. 


p. J. SCHOEN 


Miss C. Trosclair 


Miss Ysabel Puig 


Miss 


E. C. SCHULER 


Mrs. 


A. Tujague 


Miss A. Quinn 


Mrs. 


F. G. Schwabb 


Mrs. 


P. E. V'allie 


Mrs. 


E. A. Rainoli) 


Miss 


Angelo Serrane 


Mrs. 


H. M. Vallette 


Miss 


Ruth Rapier 


Miss 


I. C. Sevey 


Miss 


A. Vandenberg 


Miss 


J. H. Rapp 


Mrs. 


Ralph Shirer 


Miss 


V. S. Verrette 


Miss 


\'iola Rareshide 


Mrs. 


W. P. Simpson 


Mrs. 


K. Villemaine 


Mrs. 


E. H. Re.ad 


Mrs. 


E. W. Skene 


Mrs. 


Omer Villere 


Miss 


Eleanor Reames 


Miss 


Catherine Smart 


Mrs. 


St. Denis Villere 


Miss 


Evelyn Reames 


Mrs. 


G. C. Smith 


Mrs. 


Gilbert Vincent 


Mrs. 


H. I. Redditt 


Miss 


L. B. Snow 


Mrs. 


Anthony Vizard 


Mrs. 


John Redmann 


Miss 


A. SONIAT 


Mrs. 


A. Vizard 


Miss 


LiLLiE Reggio 


Miss 


L. SONIAT 


Miss 


Alfreda Voegtle 


Mrs. 


R. R. Reid 


Mrs. 


Marion Souchon 


Mrs. 


G. B. Von Phul 


Mrs. 


C. B. Reilly 


Mrs. 


A. J. Stafford 


Mrs. 


H. M. Von Phul 


Mrs. 


F. A. Remanjon 


Mrs. 


L. D. Stafford 


Mrs. 


\V. L. Wacuespack 


Miss 


Gladys Rensiiaw 


Mrs. 


Albert Start 


Mrs. 


J. D. Wainwright 


Mrs. 


Gus J. Ricau 


Mrs. 


A. J. Stallings 


Mrs. 


E. H. Walet 


Mrs. 


L. A. Roach 


Mrs. 


T. J. Stanton 


Mrs. 


J. M. Walsh 


Miss 


Alice Roberts 


Mrs. 


Walter Stauffer 


Miss 


Kate Walsh 


Miss 


Clara Roch 


Miss 


Mildred Steen 


Miss 


Margaret Walsh 


Mrs. 


Albert Roquet 


Miss 


Adele Stewart 


Miss 


Mary A. Walsh 


Mrs. 


C. C. Rodick 


Mrs. 


Albert Stewart 


Mrs. 


Mary E. Walsh 


Mrs. 


R. ROESSLE 


Miss 


Caroline Stier 


Miss 


Ida Whitaker 


Mrs. 


C. N. Roth 


Miss 


C. Stouse 


Miss 


LiLiE Whitaker 


Mrs. 


P. B. Salatich 


Miss 


Regina St. Paul 


Mrs. 


J. Williams 


Mrs. 


L. P. Samsot 


Mrs. 


S. Stumpf 


Mrs. 


C. D. Williford 


Miss 


Diana Sanders 


Miss 


C. Sullivan 


Mrs. 


J. P. Wilkinson 


Mrs. 


B. Sandman 


Miss 


C. Sullivan 


Mrs. 


H. W. Wilkinson 


Mrs. 


R. E. Sancier 


Mrs. 


C. F. Sullivan 


Mrs. 


C. N. Wogan 


Mrs. 


C. P. Schexnay 


Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 


J. P. Sullivan 
Violett Sullivan 
A. G. Supple 
Geo. Swabrick 
A. M. Sweeney 
J. Swoop 
K. Tanney 


Mrs. 


W. L. Wunderlich 






Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 

Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 


CiiAs. A. Tessier 
N. F. Thiberce 
F. B. Thriffley 
J. J. Thomas 
Josephine Thomas 
S. 0. Thomas 
T. P. Thompson 
Fred Tiblier 
S. L. Tiblier 

T. B. TiERNEY 

Peter Torre, Jr. 




- 



192 




1.4 



193 



THE WO L F, 1 9 2 4 



/^ 



I.OYOl.A UNP 




O L F, 19 2 4 



'T) 



LOYOLA Ur:iVL 





Wolf Staff 



MoiSF, Thibodeaux Edilor-in-Cln,f 

Harold A. Dempsey Managing Editor 

Paul A. Gaudet Associate Editor 

Gardere Moore Sforting Editor 

A. A. Lew Business Manager 

G. Price Crane College Editor 

Emile Rive Issistant College Editor 

R. J. Glas Issistant College Editor 

Joseph Tamburello Dental Editor 

W. W. Stricki.an'd Assistant Dental Editor 

D. R. IsoM Assistant Dental Editor 

A. H. GUILBEAU ■f'J^^' l''''"'"' 

Stephen- C. Hartel Assistant Law Editor 

T G V'iosca Issistant Laiv Editor 

D. M. Baker Pharmaey Editor 

Nelson- Ducas -^Issistant Pharmaey Editor 

R S Whitley Issistant Pharmaey Editor 



h 



195 



u; 1 ■ \' ' o I )7 1 (.» '/ J 



/■^ 



I r~\ \ ' o T \ T 




196 



O L V. 19 2 4 




Harold A. Dempsev Gardere Moore 

Eili/or-in-C/iirf Sporting Editor 

TiiF Mak(K)\, l'ni\er^it\ Newspaper nt a!I Oepartmeiit^, tfnimled Nn\eniher, ig23. 

THE MAROON 

STAFK 

HAROI.n A. DEMPSEV Editor-in-Chief 

AUBIN A. SONGY ] „ • ,, 

PHILIP CLARK i Business Managers 

GARDERE MOORE Sporting Editor 

ANTHONY MULLER \ vj • a, 

\VILLIAM HEBERT \ Advertising Managers 

DIOrAIJTMKXT KDI'I'OIJS 

(;EORc;E SCHOENBERGER, JR Art and Science 

ROSALIE CAREY Extension 

LESLIE LANDRY Pharmacy 

IAS. A. COMEAUX, JR Dental 

"STEPHEN C. HARTEL Law 

FACULTY AD\ ISOR 

REV. F. JANSSEN, S. J. 

Published twice every month during the Scholastic year by the Students 
of Loyola University, New Orleans, La. 

Address all correspondence to The Maroon, Loyola I'niversity, New 
Orleans, La. 

FOR A GREATER LOYOLA 



197 



-J- ]_i 17 \yr n, ] c ] Q 2 J 



! OY' 



I'y/'.i ''L'ii 






I,;, 




!i';' 



l;;:"V '11 



Loyola Dental Journal 

Journal of the College of Oentistry of Loyola riiiversity, Published by the Delta Omega 
Chapter of the Psi Omega Fraternity. 

The Staff 

Dudley R. Isom EJitor-iii-Cli'u-f 

J. A. RiciiARi) Issoiialr Editor 

H. M. Lauffer hsociale Editor 

\X. W. SiRiCKLANij Business Managrr 



. F, 19 2 4 



^^^ 



LO \ O 



L! ;■ : I y 




Loyola Law Journal 

Issued Qiiaiterly by the StLuleiits of the Sehdol of Law of Loyola rniversity. 

The Staff 

Hoi.C! i; Ci. KniiNKE, Edilor-in-Chiij 

AssocLATE Editors 

Joseph F. Devnoodt Lesslev Gardiner Alfred M. Guii.beau 

Cj. Gernon" Brown Welton P. Mouton 

IL Gradv Price 
Li.ovn Adams 
Ernest Jeanmard 

Emii.e a. Carmouche ISusiiiiss Maniiijir 

George W. CjII.l Id-vcrlis'iiu/ Manager 

Claude J. de Baroncei.li Subscription Manatjir 

W. Blair Lancaster Iltimni Majiagcr 

Faculty Advisers 

Hon. Hugh C. Cage D,iiii 

Rev. MiCHAEi, Keknv, S. J Reijiiil 

Alered J. BoNOMO Si'crelary 

'99 



\mm 



y U4 r AV/ n 1 r. ' Q 2 4 



• /-^ 



.|'!'^^^-:-''1 r 








/ 



N n^bich the leader is permiiied to — 
but will soott knon> better than n>e 
can tell him. 



^ 


\m 




UTM 




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3J 


miii 


^ 


J -iii 







4 



7 mv 



iJE. 



CHAPTER FIVE 

FEATURES 

illiiliill'lll!illWHIII''i!!i;il!l[lllll|llill[|i!l!iM!![l|l'!i|||||||!lllillllllllill!l|l|[t! 



W- O L F, 1 9 2 4 




203 



T 1-1 F \X/ n I . F 1 Q ? 4 



/^ 



LOVOLA UNIVER'f 



IWI v-r^ 






f$ 



\\-'::.-^i 






mwmmm 



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I' 



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^1 



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192 4 



,'-.':•> 



.o\ oi.:\ I :■: I viLi-:srr\ 



RECENT ADDITIONS 







— "MM SI 

T 5f J. X 









r.OliHT HALL 




Xi:\V GVM UXDER COXSTRUCTIOX 



205 



J i J c \v; r\ \ u I Q 7 4 



I o V o ! A r ' ^ 




father clm.mixgs, a. j., broadcastixg 
"listening in" 

206 



F, 19 2 4 




CLOSE-UP IN DENTAL CLINIC 

DENTAL CLINIC 

207 



-]"- u p AT/ n I i^ ''^24 



y^ 



\ nyri] A t t m j \ / 




P.ART OF $100,000.00 CHEMISTRY EQUIPMENT 
ASTRONOMY ROOM 



F, 19 2 4 



■/^ 



LOYOLA UN IV 




J'lnSILS LAl!UR.\TOR\ 

BIOLOGY LABORATORV 

CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 

209 



i O 7 J 



r^ 



LOYOLA 




On the next page begins a Scrap Book made up of clip- 
pings from the RIaroon and forming a diary of student 
activities of the past year. 



1 Q2 4 



BOAT RIDE IS A 
BRILLIANT SUCCESS 



Capitol Is Crowded With Alumni, 



Friends and Students. 

lTida\- night. Januar\- llth, was the 
big night for Loyola Students. Ko one 
that could help it missed the Big Boat 
Ride. It was the first Loyola has ever 
given. And what a jolly crowd wa 
there. Laughing, joking, 
swaying with the i 
students, alumni and 



LAW DEBATING 
SOCIETY FORMS 
CONSTITUTION 

Document Signed By Presidents 
of All \.^-wJ^^ \es. 



The La' 



of the 
a rliar- 
d 1 iu'lil 



^^W\^0 AV ..-^<1 ^O^ V '^^ -"^nts. The eight articles 
^'- Q^^^\v>4V^ ^o<i^ . O^^ the names of the various 



^sC 



.v^< 



^<e' 












fENNIS CLUB IS 

NOW FORMED 



.--; 



urnament to Be Conducted 



\^ 



VNN^' 



<>^^ 



x\^^' 



.<\^' 



"■"-^ /jiyring Year; Trophies for 



,>:^^ .,^^ 



^o 



.CN^--^ 



Ola t ^V>; ^o<^^^,^vv^ ^^o^^ ,^\ w K<^^' ^ 

:s::d^ i5< -!r^t^'-:::^^n^^'- - -- ---" ■-- '^ 

his hear\V^ XO^;. <-c^S ^ .c^^^°>^ ^^.c -° ."s C-nl, ^^lmh wa. l.egun 
.\ssociat,o v^^^^ ...V ^'" vV^ ^o^^^.^^c^ ^ s.-^ ^.c^J P-' ""■•< ■I''"' ^-'"'' 1^^- 

DEBATING SOCIETY ^^^ t^ni^r" ""' "" ^"""'" ^'^"' 

IS F0RMED'>:J^t2^ 



...^^ 



Winr 



Officers Are Elected; Much 
Enthusiasm Shown. 






.sVO^tv^^^^^^V 



l')_'-l-19_'.T and includes 
r of student, from both 
.':_'lit classf. among its 






ecH 



yV'^ 



\o 



\xV- 



'^^■'^^ p^'^'^on \mI1 pro 



Science Building 

ourt will he laid 

nimer months The or- 



miel\' since n 

Another milestone in the epoch- ^^iX-j jn^t at the beginning of the school 
making progress of Loyola University''*' \car and before the Footl)all season 
was passed when the students of the that Tennis holds such luominence in 

college department organized a long I'mversitics and (.'olUges 



wm 



I OYO' A l^- 



FRESHMEN DENTALS 
HOLD ELECTION 



LADIES AUXILIARY 
MARQUETTE ASS'N 



Pre-Meds in Executive Session. 



At a imuli ^pnilcd ilection of tin- 
Freshmen Dental Class, llic l'ollo\sini; 
officers wiie elerUd to sef ' for tlu' 
lenn of 192-1-25 ■ I.onis ''■ suc- 

ceeding Joseph Xolan.^^ a iherl 

Dolese for Preside'^ciy ^tP A. ' " 

Whitlev .^^^V^ . 



over Rol)e 
to 



ver Kol.e^^>J ^N^ *V)^ , 






At the monthly meeting which was 
held on Tuesday, February 5th,. at 
Louise G Thomas Hall, Loyola L'niver- 
•sity. the annual election of officers 
took place. The following members 
were elected : 
Miss L. DclEondio . ^ ,. President 

COLLEGE SOPHS 

HOLD BANQUET 



^* 



^' 



Fra. 

ringto 

in the ^F^ 

7 of the V ^; 

being cast. a^"'^- 

urer were: Vot ^ ^'_ 

F.drington .1; ai 






■o 



Fifteen Second Year Men Attend 
Get-Together Affair. 



_j;>^ ' j"- Sophomores of the College dc- 

".° ^^"^ t held a ban{juet in one of the 

•? .^^% downto"-- -, 

Or ^^ 



cJ>^ 6.' 



v^ 



hnnudiatcl\' 
their election 
sey, J. Dur 
vencd into A^, 
purpose 
While t 
meeting 



^% 



• Ivf DIVISION ^Vteo 



^ c J o^ '<>" 



m 



sO 



^'^f, 



Of 



M 



'^/ 



live S '.•if.,., ^'h-rl '^ 3/;^ 

■'^"'.■:°^^/o. 



'h^ 



Of 



J.Osl. .,,5^ 



. ''Or,:' fl 







dure '•"--'^ 

- — , , l^aw 

■p^bruary - 

^ the ^"^' 
.^^,,v out\>'i« 
\,een V^''' 
Vv.^iri"; 



the t 
1 on 



Soda\H> 



^c.,;;'-^o^ ^^' 






Of. 



^, 



^^u 



lOv 



\V O L. I''. I ^) 2 -! 



NOTED JESUITS 
CONDUCT MISSIONS 



Excellent Sermons and Musical 
Renditions Feature Services. 



PRINCESS BORGHESE 
ADDRESSES LAW 
STUDENTS 



The Mission, wliich will be of two 
weeks duration was opened in the 
Church of the Holy Name on Sunday, 
March 23rd, at the Ten O'clock Mass. 
The larfje crowds that have been at- 
tending the nightly services gi 
abundant proof of its success 
to the excellent sermons t 
ing preached by thc^ 
Fathers, is the '^'^^^'''^^'C^^ 
being rende ^^ f*\^ 

Loyo 
inp 



Tells of Mussolin"!^ 
And Rise of 5^ 



Greatness 
Italy. 



^i# 



(# 



#^ 



G^ 



//, 



>. 



c X h 1 

of ti 

tions. .e sinpj^ '/-p 

a Student of / '^'''i-,. '"^e 






,x\^^ 



.e^^^^ 



BEGGARS ENTERTAIN -^ 



AT DANCE ^^^^;^^ y 

First Social Affair Given B- w^ /JTV^ ^vO<^ 






The Beggars entertained at a vl 
attractive dance at the home of Mr 
and Mrs. G. J. Capdevielle in Pitt ^ <Z'' 
Street, on Saturdav .-Xpril K'th, The 






^o'^ 



.-.N-'^ 






V*^^ 



I-I 



\\' n L K I t) 7 4 



y?) 



.OYOLA UNIVKR 



FRESHMEN SHOW FINE SPIRIT 

OF CO-OPERATION AND LOYALTY 



At a general meeting of the Loyola 
Student Organization on September 27, 
1923, a list of Freshman Rules for the 
year 1923-24 was presented and en- 
dorsed by all the students of the or- 
ganization. A detailed explanation of 
these rules was given to the Freshmen, 
and Wednesday, October 10, was the 
day set aside lor them to go into 
effect. 

The Rules 

Rule 1. All Freshmen must wear th 
regulation University Skull Cap at 
times while on the grounds, at a|i^ 
letic events, and all other stude d^X 
assemblies., 

Rule 2. Ko Fre'iliman v y^' VjV'^k ' 
cess to the main entrap /•OC*' ^^ ' fX>» 



LAW DEBATING 
SOCIETY HAS A 
BRIGHT FUTURE 



<V 









Rule 3. In acco 
all Freshmen m 
athletic events \ 
cupv the place 

Note ; The Ch^ 
Lauffer and Hebert 
plcte and absolute j 
Freshmen at athletic ev 




On Tuesday. Xoveniber 27. the Loy- 

Law Deliating Society, perfected 

canization b\- the ratification oi 

and election of officers. In 

e^tal)lish a precedent, the 

■. chosen from the Senior 

Q.nresident, from the Ju- 

"\'-treasurer from the 

position of ser- 

n vacant, to lie 

^' " the pre-legal 

\-> ^ <?• \V 'anunous- 
^Np'^,^-0?' ^ Js'-^ ^4^- ,s.^^ ^ elected 

'^ ;; vict 



DISTINGUISHED 

GUEST HONORIS < 
LAW SCH00i.< 












Hon. N. P. Howell Expounds 
Canadian Judicial System. 



O,. 






'■'% 
<.,.% 



-/^ 






%;, 



In an eloquent address to the fac\' p.^^r/ ^/j ''cA 
and student body of the Law Sc /^ ''•''f ^ f ^f . 
on January 7th, Hon. N. P. R /q, ^ t/, ^% ''o-/- '^e ' 2\^ 
former attorney-general of Cap '^o ''</ . ''hj, '^p '^ p ^' O ^t 
an authority on internatio '^/^ '^^ j^ (>/'''^'t ^^'^c/^'''''o'^% '-v? 
pointed out the similarity o'^ ^ "^.j, °0/. ^c/y •"'/,/. % ^ ot ^, ^ 
of Canada and the United /.„%/,/%„%/>,_'*'',, °'^0/°'^' 



•/Q) 



^X 

V 



■^ 



/93 



urged a "speeding up" of Ar O/j- 



V .. ^'^ 



'■^A 



<'/> 



'f>, 



Of Ojr '^c^ ■ fj, 



held 



"■</, 




2IS 



W O I F 



9-2 4 



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I n y o I A 1 1 : 



i'']:-\-i' 



ii i;! 



ci ;■■■;•-■<! 















Beaucoudray's Pharmacy 




COMPLIMENTS OF 






Eugene H. Beaucoudrav, Pc.G. 

PllARMAClST AND ChEMIST 




W. M. MAYO 






4640 S. Claiborne Ave., Upperline 
Service — Purity — Quality 




BIJOU PHARMACY NO. 2 






New Orleans, La. 




NEW ORLEANS, LA. 






W. G. NAPP 




Singer s Pkarmacy 

Service and QuaUiy 






Pharmacist 




Delivery Anywhere 






5000 Prvtania New Orleans, La. 




CaRONDELET and PoLVMNlA 

Phone Jackson 80 








!V.fl 


% 




■ 


! - ". ' 


■•i"! i 


\ r .'I ' 


-^^ll 


i¥ 





George McNulty 

Pharmacist 

3800 Magazine St., corner Peniston 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



SIMON PURE DRUGS 

Prescriptions Accurately Compounded 
Howard Ave. and' Camp St. 

Phone Main I960 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 





Schertz Pharmacies 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 




THE CHOICE OF DIXIE 
Adonis Chocolates 
PAUL FREUND, Inc. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
















LAFAYETTE FIRE 
INSURANCE CO. 

A Home Instilutwn 
2123 Magazine Street 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 




COMPLIMENTS OF 
A FRIEND 















V\' n I , i' , I ') 




CHEMISTRY DESKS 

Similar to the above are installed in Loyola University, 
New Orleans, La. This type of student's chemistry 
desk, with some changes for certain work, is suitable for 
all chemistry departments. Long compartments for 
the storage of condensers can be installed in the cub- 
boards. 



Some of the well-known instilutions using our furniture are: 

Loyola University. New Orleans, La.; Loyola College, Baltimore, Md.; Boston College, 
Newlon, Mass.; Marquette University (Dental Department). Milwaukee. Wis.; St. Eliza- 
beth's Hospital, Appleton, Wis.; Catholic High School, Dululh, Minn,; Mt. St. Scholaslica's 
Academy, Atchison, Kan. 

WRITE FOR OUR CATALOG NO. 80. 

WIESE LABORATORY FURNITURE CO. 

FACTORY. MANITOWOC, WIS. 

JAMES H. JONES 

Southern Rcprt'scnUUivc 
7^04 St. Charles, New Orleans, La. 




I please Loyola and I can please you in both quality 
and price. Wnle for prices on Church Furniture, 
School Desks. Opera Chairs, or anything in School 
Supplies, Disinfectants, Floor Dressings, or Janitor 
Supplies. 

SOUTHERN AGENT FOR THE 
WIESE LABORATORY FURNITURE CO. 



Visit Loyola s new Science 
Buildino, one of the finest 
in the South, and equipped 
with the Wiese Line. 



JAMES H. JONES 



.Suutheni .AfiMit lor 

Manitowoc Church Furniture Co. 



WiESE Labor.atory Furniture Co. 



f-! V \'i O 1 



92 4 



/"-"N 



,OYOI 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF LAW 

RECOGNIZED BY STATE OF LOUISIANA 
AND CONDUCTED BY A FACULTY 
OF EXPERIENCED PRACTITION- 
ERS AND JURISTS 

Tnree-Year Course Based on tne Civil 
Code and Embracing the Entire Field ot 
Lav^^. 

Pre-Legal Courses in the Collegiate 
Subjects Requisite for Legal Studies. 

Post-Graduate Course Qualifying for 
LL.M. Degree. 

Summer School in Pre-Legal Courses. 



HON. HUGH C. CAGE, Bean 



y'^X 



.c;)"\'OLA UN I V' Ki^: 



Daviason Dental 
Supply Co. 

INCORPORATED 

Dental Supplies 
Dental Laboratory 



741 Maison Blanche Building 
New Orleans, La. 

407 Hutchinson Building 
Shreveport, La. 



Earle J. Chistenberry 



822 Perdido Street 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 



TMl:', WOLF. 



jTs 



1.0^■0LA UMT\ 



PHONE MAIN 1938 

Rembrandt Studio 

PARTIES, WEDDINGS. HOME 
PORTRAITS 

918 Canal Street 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



RICHAI^ RELF 


Pnotogra^Jier 


707 Canal Street 


Phone Main 4097 



i;\ i:i{vi!(>i)v KNous .\m) vsks 

STECKLER'S SEEDS 

Garden, Field, Flower and Bulbs 
Our references are 50 years of continuous 
Selling' and satisfied customers. We sell 
only quality seeds. We specialize in Les- 
pedeza Clover, Clover Seeds, Field and 
Garden Corn. 

J. STECKLKK SKKD CO.. Ltd. 
Mi <ira\ier St. New Orleans, l.u. 



'■<iuali(\ <.o.hN for l-i--.- 

AUDUBON DENTAL 
SUPPLY CO. 

.Audubon Building, 927 Canal Street 

Phone Main 5390 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



WHEN YOU HAVE PLUMBING TROUBLE 
PHONE MAIN 1200 

BABST (Service) 

'The Plumber Who Works With a Vim" 




■■'') 



LOYOLA UMLv'L 



Autin y RicKard 

JEWELERS AND GIFT 
COUNSELORS 

Specialists in College Jewelry 



Our Representative Will Gladly 

Call and Submit Samples on 

Request 



113 BARONNE STREET 
PHONE M. 4041 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

UNITED FRUIT 
COMPANY 



NEW ORLEANS. LA. 



EVERYTHING THE BEST 

R. E. BLANCHARD, Pkarmacist 

THREE STORES WITH BUT A SINGLE THOUGHT— 
TO SERVE YOU RIGHT 



7600 St. Charles Ave. 

Telephones: 

Walnut 806 and 1046 



2101 Carrollton Ave. 

Telephones : 

Walnut 101 1 and 372 



1 138 Carrollton Ave. 

Telephones : 
Walnut nil and 9137 



PIANOS 


ORGANS 




RIVE AND RIVE 




1055 CAMP STREET, NEW ORLEANS, LA. 


PIANOS 


ORGANS 



T 'ri F. W O L F. 19 2 4 



y^ 



LOYOLA UNIV 















i 


RAPIDES DRUG COMPANY 

LIMITED 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

DRUGS, STATIONERY. TOBACCO 
CIGARS 

ALEXANDRIA, LOUISIANA 






;-:- ■! 


i 








'■' pi') 


i 
i 


GULF REFINING COMPANY 

PHILADELPHIA 
PENNSYLVANIA 


I 




1 

1.; 









LO^VOLA UN IV 




Vhe 

Roosevelt 



NEW ORLEANS 



7- u p \Y/ r> J r 1 Q 2 -1 



] r^'Kr r\i a i t ]^t t ■ 



!i fr:^) 



'-^■^■:^-i;- 1! 






(0 ':'> \ 



APPRECIATIONS OF 

MAURICE B. MURPHY 

FOR THE UNTIRING EFFORTS OF 

THE BEGGARS 

IN BEHALF OF 

LOYOLA 






^i) 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 













A.J.LABURRES 

DRUG STORE 




Giarratano s Pharmacy 




Nothing Bui the Bat 




Napoleon Ave. and S. Robertson 




ISOl Mrigiiziiif St. New nik-uns, La. 








Phoiif Ja.-Uson 9135 




NEW ORLEANS, LA. 




BEST WISHES! 




Gaudet's Drug Store 




W. S. BENDER, Realtor 




The Store with the RapiJ Delivery 




1016 Maison Blanche Building 




Jackson Ave. and Prylania St. 




Phone M. 7263. New Orleans. La. 




NEW ORLEANS, LA. 




Wm. Frantz ^ Co., Inc. 




Duggan's Pharmacy 




/eijie/ers and Oplicians 




L. H. Knoblock. Prop. 




129 Carondt-lct Strt-t-t 




!3ir, Magazine Street 




NEW ORLE.\NS. L,\. 




NEW ORLEANS 




WILLIAM M. LEVY 




Burvant s Pharmacy 




PHARMACIST 




The Stcre Tviih the Red Arrom 




13S2-1384 Magazine St.. Cor. TiTi>.siehor.' 








NEW ORLEANS 




4 33 Ro.val Street 




Phone Jarli.son 550-9170 




(Opposite New Court House Blrig.) 




Presrrii)tions i-ar.rully ( ■i.iiiii. , uii.lv. 1 




Plum.- Main <i2:;i 




CHALIN'S 








ALIMENTARY ELIXIR 




COMPLIMENTS OF 




lUOST OIST.VINAIJI.IO 

CHALIN IPSER DRUG CO., Inc. 




THE BEGGARS 




y2S Ii..atur St. N..«- c irl.ans. La. 






i 



LOYOLA 

IS HELPING YOUR CITY AND STATE 
ARE YOU HELPING LOYOLA U? 



Join the great number of ambitious men and women who are 
preparing for their professions at Loyola University. 

New buildings; splendid facilities; beautiful surroundings. 

Loyola IS youthful, alive, inspiring. Its courses are stimulating 
and thorough. Its graduates are successful and in demand. Pre- 
pare now to enter one of the following departments next fall. Make 
your app'ication early. Send for a catalogue of the department 
which most interests you. Choose from the following: 

L Arts, leading to A.B. Degree. 

2. Sciences, leading to B.S. Degree. 

3. Dentistry, Leading to D.D.S. Degree. 

4. Pnarmacy, leading to Pn.G. Degree. 

5. Pre-Medical, preparing for Medical School. 

6. Law, leading to LL.B. Degree. 

7. Accountancy and Finance. 

8. Extension Night Courses, leading to Bachelor's 
Degree. 

9. Saturday Extension Courses for Teachers. 



For further information, apply to the 

REGISTRAR, LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 

6363 St. Charles Ave. New Orleans, La. 




The Ansley 




DINKIER 
HOTELS 

HOTEL TUTWILER 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 

356 Rooms 

125 Room Addition to Open in 1925 

HOTEL PIEDMONT 

ATLANTA. GA. 
400 Rooms 

HOTEL ANSLEY 

ATLANTA, GA. 

450 Rooms 

HOTEL PHOENIX 

WAYCROSS, GA. 

HOTEL REDMONT 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 
(Now Building) 

DIRECTION 

DINKIER HOTEL 
COMPANY 

Dispensers of True SoiiOiern 
HospilaUl\, 




The TuTwii er 




The Redmo.nt 



The Piedmont 



THE "VX/ O L F 1924 



L, O Y O L A U N n/ E R SIT" 



!r^;^i 









1 


SPECIALISTS IN BURNED CLAY PRODUCTS 






COMPLIMENTS OF 




1 


KEELING-CASSIDY BRICK CO. 






234 PEACHTREE STREET 






ATLANTA, GEORGIA 






SPECIALISTS IN BURNED CLAY PRODUCTS 






COMPLIMENTS OF 






PARKER-BLAKE COMPANY, LTD. 






1 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS 




■ 


FULTON AND COMMON STREETS 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 


1 


i^n. 










LJJ \ (J LA 



J. A MAJORS 
^ COMPANY 

MEDICAL BOOKS 

AND 

INSTRUMENTS 

130] TULANE AVENUE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

A DRUGGIST 
FRIEND 

OF LOYOLA 



J. J. GARVEY 
COMPANY 



ROASTED COFFEE 
VINEGAR 

AND 

MOLASSES 



1230 CLARA STREET 



GREETINGS 

TO 

THE WOLF 

FROM 

THE LOYOLA 

DENTAL 

CLINIC 



THIS BOOK PRINTED BY BENSON 




LARGEST COLLEGE ANNUAL 
PUBLISHERS IN THE WORLD 

HIGHEST QUALITY WORKMANSHIP 
SUPERIOR EXTENSIVE SERVICE 




ENSOlJ' 
PRINTING COJ 
NASHVILLE., 
^JENN. 

COLLEGE ANNUAL HEADQUARTERS